Sunday, July 31, 2011

Natural Resources, Health departments to take additional water samples, inspect cove for E. coli at Lake of the Ozarks

Low-temperature electron micrograph of a clust...Image via Wikipedia JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., JULY 29, 2011 -- The Missouri departments of Natural Resources and Health and Senior Services will collect additional water quality samples and inspect Possum Hollow Cove in the Lake of the Ozarks following E. coli levels in excess of federal guidelines.
            On May 23, the Lake of the Ozarks Watershed Alliance began a 20-week water quality monitoring project to address stormwater-related pollution affecting the Lake of the Ozarks. As part of the project, LOWA conducts weekly water quality sampling from coves located between mile markers 1-19. Sample results are then shared with both state agencies to take necessary action as needed. Results are also posted online at dnr.mo.gov/loz/loz-waterquality-study.htm.
            Samples collected from Possum Hollow Cove on Monday, July 25, found three of the four samples exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s recommended maximum level for swimming areas of 235 E. coli colonies per 100 milliliters of water. Sample results ranged from 99.0 to 866.4 E. coli colonies per 100 milliliters of water. These results were received yesterday, July 28.
            Staff from the Department of Natural Resources’ Southwest Regional Office will collect additional water quality samples and complete an inspection of the area to determine if there are observable discharges into the coves’ watershed that may be contributing to water quality issues.
            Staff from the Department of Health and Senior Services will accompany the Department of Natural Resources to aid in the visual inspection. In addition, DHSS will distribute informational flyers to area residents.  If residents are experiencing problems with their on-site sewage systems they are encouraged to contact the Morgan County Health Department for assistance.   
            The sample test results indicate a snap shot of the water quality taken at the cove at a specific time; however, a single sample does not provide an overall sense of the water quality in the lake. A total of nine coves are tested weekly as part of this water quality monitoring project. Sample results collected from the remaining eight coves were below federal guidelines.
            Sample results from LOWA’s water quality monitoring project are available on the Department of Natural Resources’ website at dnr.mo.gov/loz/loz-waterquality-study.htm.

Saturday, July 30, 2011

Open House and Bug Day planned Aug. 13 at Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., JULY 29, 2011 -- The public is invited to bring their ideas to an open house on Aug. 13, at Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park in Wildwood. In conjunction with the open house, the park will also host Bug Day, which features fun family activities focused on the world of insects. The open house and Bug Day event will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the park’s visitor center. These activities are free and open to the public.
During the open house, representatives from the park will review recent activities and projects at the facility, including storm damage clean up, installation of campground booth, creation of walkway to Walnut Grove Shelter and the upcoming Alta Shelter restoration. Visitors will be invited to share comments regarding park operations services, and future plans for development. 
Bug Day activities will include an insect talent show at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Other Bug Day activities will include exhibits, games, crafts and an insect zoo. These activities will be fun for all ages.
This open house is part of an ongoing effort to ensure citizens have input on facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.
Dr. Edmund A. Babler Memorial State Park is located 20 miles west of St. Louis on Highway BA, between U.S. 40 and Highway 100. People requiring special services or accommodations to attend the open house can make arrangements by calling the park directly at 636-458-3813 or by calling the Missouri Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800 379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf). For more information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. 

Friday, July 29, 2011

Brown patches in trees may be a result of cicadas and scale insects

Written by Rebecca Maples, MDC


JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – This year’s summer green is being interrupted by brown patches in Missouri’s trees, and it’s not just because of the heat.
Brown leaves can appear on trees in many patterns for many reasons. Common this summer are small clusters of wilted, brown leaves scattered throughout tree crowns and around yards. These dead tree-branch tips are cases of “branch flagging,” which can be caused by insects, disease or weather-related injury.

This year, the prevalent branch flagging in many parts of the state is largely a result of two insects: the 13-year periodical cicadas that emerged in May and much less obvious insects called Kermes scales, which appear more like galls or buds than insects.

“In years when periodical cicadas emerge, branch flagging can be widespread and dramatic,” said Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) Forest Entomologist Rob Lawrence. “Branch flagging in these years results from the cicadas’ breeding and egg-laying behavior.”

Once periodical cicadas emerge from the ground, shed their exoskeletons and dry their wings, they mate and lay eggs in the twigs of trees. Female cicadas use a saw-like appendage on the abdomen to slice into the underside of twigs and deposit their eggs. The weakened twigs are often broken by wind, causing bunches of leaves to dangle from branches or fall to the ground.

Cicada-damaged twigs can be identified by a line of small slits on the underside. MDC recommends only very light pruning in the summer if necessary, with heavier corrective pruning as needed when trees are dormant in the winter.

Branch flagging can occur due to causes other than cicadas. A main source of tree damage in southwestern Missouri has been Kermes scales, sap-feeding insects that damage oak trees. These tan to reddish-brown insects, less than 1/4 inch wide, feed by inserting tube-like mouthparts into plant tissue and sucking out fluids. Kermes scales can be treated in late fall with systemic insecticides labeled for use on soft scales on oaks, or they can be left for their natural enemies to control.

Other possible causes of branch flagging include insects such as twig girdlers and twig pruners, or Botryosphaeria cankers caused by a fungus.

Another more serious concern is thousand cankers disease of black walnut, which has not yet been detected in Missouri but can cause wilted, brown leaves to remain on branches and eventually kill walnut trees.

“For all causes of branch flagging, reducing further stress on the tree provides the best chance for it to recover,” Lawrence said. “This might include supplemental watering during drought, avoiding injury to trunk and roots with mowing equipment and avoiding excess pruning and other damage.”

For information on how to identify and address tree-health issues associated with branch flagging, visit the MDC website at www.mdc.mo.gov and search “Tree-Branch Flagging.”

Pump failure results in release of 300,000 gallons of wastewater to stream in Republic

Wastewater dischargeImage via WikipediaJEFFERSON CITY, MO, JULY 29, 2011 – A malfunction in a wastewater pumping station resulted in the release Thursday of an estimated 300,000 gallons of wastewater to a dry stream in Republic, according to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.
Republic city officials notified the department Thursday morning that a seal in a pump at the Shuyler Creek  Lift Station had failed, resulting in the pump shorting out and tripping the main breaker at the station. Without power to the pumps, the wastewater overflowed to the nearby stream.
City staff contained the spill to a 300-foot stretch of the previously dry creek. After bringing the station back into service, crews pumped the wastewater back into the system and began cleaning the area, including flushing the creek with water and pumping that into the wastewater collection system as well.
The department dispatched investigators from its Southwest Regional Office in Springfield to the site of the release to determine the extent of the release and gauge any environmental damage. Regional office staff will use the investigator’s findings plus the city’s incident report to determine what enforcement action will be taken in the case.

The department considers discharges of wastewater from sanitary sewer collection systems to be potential threats to public health and the environment. Such discharges have the potential to contaminate lakes and streams, causing serious water quality problems.

Sanitary sewer overflows can be caused by mechanical failure, obstructions in sewer lines, infiltration of rainwater and snow melt into aging systems, or undersized systems that cannot compensate for sudden increases in wastewater.
Communities across Missouri produce millions of gallons of wastewater that must be properly transported and treated before being released to waterways. However, some communities are facing challenges in accomplishing this.
In order to protect public health and the environment, the department requires communities to take appropriate action to eliminate their sanitary sewer overflow issues. To do this, communities should develop a system to track information about such incidents, including the date, time, location and size of the overflow, weather data, who notified them, when they notified the department and the measures taken to respond. The community can then use this data to aid in developing a plan to inspect the collection system, and plan and finance system upgrades.
To report an environmental emergency, including after-hour sewage overflows, please contact the DNR spill line at 573-634-2436. To report sewage overflows during regular business hours, contact the nearest regional office. A list of regional offices, their contact information and service areas is available online: http://dnr.mo.gov/regions/regions.htm.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

7/28/2011 MDC Fishing Report

PLEASE CHECK REGULATIONS CAREFULLY: Special regulations may apply to designated portions of water bodies; some baits and lures may not be legal for all portions.


CENTRAL REGION (573) 882-8388

    LAKES

Binder: 91 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish good on liver and stinkbaits; bluegill good on crickets and worms; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures; all other species slow.




 (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Blind Pony Lake: 85 degrees, dingy; 2' low; all species slow; the lake is closed to private boats, and bait held or transported in containers with water is prohibited. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Bagnell Tailwater): 72 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow, try worms, soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass fair on light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; catfish fair using stinkbaits, worms, chicken livers, raw chicken and cut shad.


 (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Glaize): 90 degrees, dingy; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; black bass fair using dark colored soft plastics and crankbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; catfish fair on worms, bluegill and hot dogs.
 (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Gravois): 90 degrees, dingy; catfish fair on cut baits; all other species slow.
 (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Niangua): 90 degrees, dingy; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; black bass fair using dark colored soft plastics and crankbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; catfish fair on worms, bluegill and hot dogs.
 (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Osage): 90 degrees, dingy; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; black bass fair using dark colored soft plastics and crankbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; catfish fair on worms, bluegill and hot dogs.
 (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Little Dixie: 88 degrees, low, clear; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures;  channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and cut bait;  all other species slow.  Area closed to all activity between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

    RIVERS

Lamine: muddy; 7'-8' high between the I-70 bridge and the Missouri River; little to no fishing activity during the past week; 6' high from the I-70 bridge upstream to the mouth of Clear Creek; little to no fishing activity during the past week; water level is normal in the Otterville area where all species are slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Missouri (Middle): high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Osage (lower, at Tuscumbia): 80 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow, try worms, soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass fair on light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; catfish fair using stinkbaits, worms, chicken livers, raw chicken and cut shad.
 (Report made on 7/27/2011)

----------------------
KANSAS CITY REGION (816) 655-6254

    LAKES

James A. Reed Area: 92 degrees, low, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Montrose: 92 degrees, low, dingy; all species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Schell-Osage (Atkinson Lake): 94 degrees, low, dingy; all species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Schell-Osage (Schell Lake): 92 degrees, low, dingy; crappie fair; all other species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Truman: 89 degrees, low, dingy; crappie and black bass fair using crankbaits and plastic worms; catfish fair using cut bait or shad; white bass and hybrid bass fair using spoons.  (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Truman Tailwaters: 89 degrees, low, dingy; all species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

    RIVERS

Missouri River: high, the river is flooded; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

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NORTHEAST REGION (660) 785-2420

    LAKES

Hunnewell: 85 degrees, low, clear; bluegill good on red worms; crappie good on Little Cleos; channel catfish fair on chicken liver; largemouth bass fair on buzzbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Long Branch: 85 degrees, high, clear; channel catfish good on setlines using live bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Mark Twain: 86 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie fair on assorted jigs and minnows; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Sever: 91 degrees, low, dingy; channel catfish fair on dip baits; crappie fair on minnows in the brush; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Thomas Hill: 88 degrees, high, clear; 92 degrees in warm water arm; channel catfish fair on liver and nightcrawlers; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

    RIVERS

Mississippi (above St. Louis): 85 degrees, dingy; channel catfish good on stinkbaits and nightcrawlers; flathead catfish good on live bait; blue catfish good on cut bait; drum good on nightcrawlers; carp good on doughbait; all other species slow.  (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Salt (below Mark Twain): 78 degrees, clear; smallmouth bass fair on chartreuse spinners; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

----------------------
NORTHWEST REGION (816) 271-3100

    LAKES

Bilby Ranch Lake: 85 degrees, normal, clear; black bass good on topwater lures and crankbaits; channel catfish good on liver; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Mozingo: 85 degrees, normal, clear; black bass good in low light hours; crappie fair on jigs over deeper brush; channel catfish good on cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Paho: 85 degrees, dingy; channel catfish fair on prepared baits and liver in the evening; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/25/2011)

Pony Express: 86 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish good on stinkbait; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Smithville: 84 degrees, high, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

    RIVERS

Grand: 76 degrees, falling, muddy; all species fair. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Missouri (below Iowa line): 85 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

----------------------
OZARK REGION (417) 255-9561

    LAKES

Bull Shoals (East): 88 degrees, high, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Norfork: 89 degrees, high, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

    RIVERS

Big Piney (lower, Pulaski Co.): 83 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on jigs and soft plastic baits.  (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Big Piney (Upper): 78 degrees, low, clear; black bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastic baits and live baits in early morning and late evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Bryant Creek: 82 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastics. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Current: 78 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass good on plastics; all other species good on soft plastics and live bait. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Eleven Point: 62 degrees, low, clear; rainbow trout good on corn and minnows; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Gasconade (middle, Pulaski Co.): 85 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass fair on soft plastic baits and spinners; channel catfish fair on live bait. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Gasconade (upper): 87 degrees, low, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Jacks Fork: 79 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastics and Beetle Spins. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

North Fork: 69 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastic baits. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

----------------------
SOUTHEAST REGION (573) 290-5858

    LAKES

Clearwater Lake: 88 degrees, normal, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Council Bluff: 89 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish fair on liver and worms after dark; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Cypress Lake: 89 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good in 2'-3' depths using crickets, worms, and stinkbait; crappie slow in 3' depths using minnows and jigs; bluegill and redear sunfish fair in 1'-3' depths using crickets, small jigs, and small pieces of worms; largemouth bass slow in 2'-3' depths on spinnerbaits and jigs;  all other species slow. (Report made on 7/26/2011)

Duck Creek: 89 degrees, falling, clear; largemouth bass good on topwater lures; bluegill, redear sunfish and warmouth sunfish good on crickets. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Lake Girardeau: 86 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish fair on worms; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Perry County Lake: 88 degrees, dingy; channel catfish fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Robert DeLaney Lake: 86 degrees, normal, channel catfish fair on worms, liver, stinkbait and live sunfish; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/26/2011)

Wappapello: normal, black bass fair early and late on plastic worms and crankbaits; crappie fair on minnows and jigs in the river channel above Chaonia Landing; bluegill fair on crickets and worms; channel catfish fair at night on live bait and nightcrawlers on trotlines and jug lines. Anglers should note the 9" minimum length regulation for crappie on Wappapello Lake. All areas around the lake are now open since the lake water level has dropped.  Call the Wappapello Lake Recreation Hotline for updates at 573-222-8139. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

    RIVERS

Black River (near Annapolis): 80 degrees, low, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Castor River (above Zalma): low, clear; black bass good on Rapalas and Beetle Spins; sunfish good on jigs and jigs with spinners. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Lower Black River (Clearwater Dam): normal, dingy; crappie fair on minnows; bluegill fair on worms; black bass fair on worms and topwater lures; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/26/2011)

Mississippi (below Charleston): normal, dingy; channel catfish fair on live frogs and worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/26/2011)

Mississippi River (Cape Girardeau): high, muddy; channel catfish and blue catfish good on cut baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

St. Francis (above Wappapello): low, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 7/26/2011)

St. Francis (below Wappapello): 80 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on stinkbait and chicken liver; flathead catfish good on live bait, sunfish and goldfish; bluegill fair on waxworms; black bass fair on artificial bait and spinnerbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

----------------------
SOUTHWEST REGION (417) 895-6881

    LAKES

Bull Shoals (West): 80-84 degrees, high, clear; Dam/Swan Creek area: black bass fair on jigs, soft plastics, and nightcrawlers; striped bass fair on large swimbait, jerkbait, and shad; walleye fair on nightcrawlers and jerkbaits; Beaver Creek area: catfish good on nightcrawlers; black bass fair on jigs, soft plastics and nightcrawlers; walleye fair on nightcrawlers and jerkbait; bluegill fair on crickets and worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Lake Taneycomo: 56 degrees, normal, dingy; trout good on sculpin and scud type flies, black/olive marabou jigs, bubblegum/chartreuse Power Baits, corn and nightcrawlers, Rooster Tails and crankbaits also working well. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Pomme de Terre: 86 degrees, low, clear; largemouth bass good on plastic baits on points and around structure in 15' of water; catfish good on trotlines and jug lines using live bait; bluegill good on nightcrawlers in 10' of water; crappie fair on minnows in 15' of water around structure; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Stockton: 86 degrees, low, clear; catfish good while fishing over brush piles and flats in 15' - 20' of water; crappie fair on minnows in 15' - 20' of water over brush piles and while trolling; walleye fair on gigs and nightcrawlers in 18' of water around points and on flats; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Table Rock (James River arm): 85 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms in 20'-25' of water around bridge piers and standing timber in clear water; black bass fair dragging soft plastic crayfish on points, Carolina or Texas rigged are best in at least 25' of water; white bass fair in evenings using topwater lures or shallow diving lures, bright colors best; all other species slow.  (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Table Rock (main lake): 85 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms in 20'-25' of water around bridge piers and standing timber in clear water; black bass fair dragging soft plastic crayfish on points, Carolina or Texas rigged are best in at least 25' of water; white bass fair in evenings using topwater lures or shallow diving lures, bright colors best; all other species slow.  (Report made on 7/28/2011)

    RIVERS

Big Niangua: 75 degrees, normal, clear; black bass fair on soft plastics; goggle-eye fair on soft plastics and jigs; trout fair on natural baits and Power Baits below Bennett Spring; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

James River (lower): 85 degrees, normal, clear; black bass fair on crankbaits off points and Texas rigged with live worms and dark colored soft plastic baits; catfish good on cut bait and nightcrawlers, use trotline at night; crappie fair around brush piles on jigs and minnows; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

----------------------
ST. LOUIS REGION (636) 300-1953

    LAKES

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lake 33: 87 degrees, normal, dingy; bluegill fair on worms; black bass fair on minnows; channel catfish good on doughbaits and blood baits; please remove your litter.  (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lakes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 23: 88 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on doughbaits and blood baits; limit 4; please remove litter.


 (Report made on 7/28/2011)

    RIVERS

Big River: 82 degrees, high, muddy; channel catfish fair on cut bait, 4" bluegill and worms; black bass slow on minnows; crappie slow on minnows; bluegill fair on crickets; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Bourbeuse (middle, lower, Franklin Co.): 80 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish fair on worms and blood baits; black bass slow on plastic worms; bluegill good on worms and crickets; carp slow; all other species fair on natural baits.
 (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Meramec (above Sullivan, Crawford Co.): 85 degrees, falling, clear; black bass fair on plastic worms; channel catfish fair on stinkbait and worms; goggle-eye, bluegill and sunfish good on worms and crickets; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Meramec (below Eureka): 85 degrees, falling, clear; channel catfish fair on natural baits; black bass fair on plastic worms; goggle-eye, bluegill and sunfish fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Missouri (below New Haven): 83 degrees, high, muddy;  channel catfish good on worms and prepared baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

----------------------
TROUT PARKS

Bennett Spring State Park: 56 degrees, clear; the spring level is near normal; Zone 1 and 2 best lures: red colored and red with green head colored brassies, John Deere colored mini jigs, ginger colored and brown colored bead head Cracklebacks, gingersnap with 8 oz. gold head colored, red and black colored, pink and white colored and salmon and brown colored  marabou jigs, green and black with a gold spinner and black colored with a silver spinner Rooster Tails, shrimp colored, chartreuse colored and red and white colored glo balls, red colored and olive colored brassies; Zone 3 best lures: salmon peach colored and yellow colored Power Baits, pink colored and fluorescent orange colored worms, and salmon eggs. Fishing hours for July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.  August fishing hours are 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.  We will be cutting weeds on August 2 and 3.  We will begin around 8:00 a.m. and finish around 3:00 p.m.  Thank you for your patience during our weed cutting operation!  (R
 eport made on 7/28/2011)

Maramec Spring Park: 57 degrees, fishing is excellent; the water is clear with good flow; weed cutting has been completed and the spring branch is much more clear of aquatic vegetation; throughout the spring branch feather jigs in black/yellow, olive, white, and pink are producing good numbers of fish; dough and putty baits are producing good numbers when fished free floating or underneath a float; fishing hours for the month of July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.  August hours are 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.  Women's Free Fishing Day is Saturday, September 10th. (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Montauk State Park: 58 degrees, the river level is normal; the water is clear; fishing is good on most baits; scented dough and putty baits are working well, as are flies, Rooster Tails and jigs, black and yellow, white, and olive colors are working well. The best fishing is during the morning and evening hours. Fishing hours for July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.  August fishing hours are 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.


For up-to-date stream conditions check  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440 (Report made on 7/28/2011)

Roaring River State Park: 58 degrees, the water is clear and normal; fishing has been very good early in the day, late in the evening and shady spots during the day; dry fly fishing is excellent right now; cheese yellow, white fluorescent, orange and brown colors in plastic eggs and worms working well; black, brown, olive and white spinners working well; small crankbaits are working well; marabou and micro jigs are good; olive, white, black/yellow and tan are good; in Zone 3: nightcrawlers, minnows and corn, white, orange or fluorescent yellow Power Bait paste is working well.
 (Report made on 7/27/2011)

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Grand Glaize Beach at Lake of the Ozarks State Park reopens

Lake of the Ozarks,MO.Image by km6xo via Flickr
JEFFERSON CITY, MO, JULY 27, 2011 – Visitors to Lake of the Ozarks State Park’s Grand Glaize Beach can once again jump into the waterbeat the summer heat and have fun at the lake this weekend following the latest water sample results. 
            “The public is becoming very familiar with our website and the beach status information posted on the web,” said Bill Bryan, director of Missouri State Parks, a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.  “So, it was no surprise that when our park staff arrived to reopen the Grand Glaize beach they were met by 20 swimmers who had already checked the website and were ready to go swimming.”
            The Grand Glaize Beach reopened today after water samples taken Monday showed bacteria levels well below the department’s acceptable levels for state park beaches. 
            The water at all designated beaches in the state park system is sampled weekly during the recreational season by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to determine suitability for swimming. Water quality can be determined to be unsuitable for swimming based on either the single sample taken earlier in the week, or by the geometric mean, which is a mathematical value that takes into consideration results from the current week plus the results taken during the previous weeks.
            The sample test results indicate a snap shot of the water quality taken at the beaches at a specific time; however, a single sample does not provide an overall sense of the water quality in the lake where the beach is located. Water samples are taken to check for E. coli, a common indicator species for bacteria.
            Information about current status of beaches at other parks is available on the website at mostateparks.com. Signs indicating the status of the beaches are posted at the beaches as well.
            Beaches and other facilities at state parks may be unavailable for reasons unrelated to bacteria, such as the beach at Lewis and Clark State Park, which remains closed due to flooding. Missouri State Parks maintains a list of alerts and advisories at mostateparks.com.
            Missouri's state parks and historic sites offer something to suit everyone's taste - outdoor adventure, great scenery and a bit of history. With Missouri’s 85 state parks and historic sites, the possibilities are boundless.
            For more information about Missouri state parks and historic sites and swimming beaches, visit mostateparks.com.

Should States Try to Override Federal Environmental Initiatives?

How is Industry and Corporate America Attempting to Influence Environmental Protection 
and 
Conservation?

When people make considered decisions about what they believe, they do like to have all of the information they can get their hands on.  They also want to know from whom the information came, and what dog they might have had in the fight.  It has come to my attention that many efforts at amending environmental, conservation, and fish and game management rules have been made in a spurious manner.  I will be more specific momentarily, but first let me lay some groundwork.

Obviously, corporate interests are motivated to resist legislative and regulatory changes that will compromise their bottom line.  In fact, they are even interested in affecting changes that will eliminate regulatory and legislative impediments already in place.  That is no big surprise.

We expect the oil and gas industry, the coal industry, the nuclear power industry to name a few to lobby in Washington D.C.  We even understand that these companies and their trade groups find ways to fund trips, dinners, and more.  But, they and their partners in crime have a found an even more efficient way to work together.

There is a membership organization where legislators (in fact nearly 100% Republican) and "private sector"groups draft model legislation that eventually usually finds its way to being introduced in state legislatures (nearly all efforts are at the state level).  The "private sector" groups are corporations, industry trade groups, and conservative think tanks.  

The structure of their operations is that most of their work is done in committees.  Each committee has 2 co-chairs.  One is a legislator and the other is a public sector representative as described above.  The private sector representative of the committee that wrote the model legislation I am about to describe, was a representative from a gas industry trade group.  

The organization I am describing is the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). They have legislative members from most if not all states - this includes Missouri.  In subsequent posts, I will expose who some of these folks are, and I will also expose those who are not members but sponsor their legislation.

In fact, much of their model legislation is adopted verbatim in states around the country.  The model legislation I am discussing today is called (by them) "State Withdrawal from Regional Climate Initiatives."  

To quote:
"WHEREAS, there has been no credible economic analysis of the costs associated
with carbon reduction mandates and the consequential effect of the increasing
costs of doing business in the State of ______;

WHEREAS, forcing business, industry, and food producers to reduce carbon
emissions through government mandates and cap-and-trade policies under
consideration for the regional climate initiative will increase the cost of doing
business, push companies to do business with other states or nations, and increase
consumer costs for electricity, fuel, and food;

WHEREAS, the Congressional Budget Office warns that the cost of cap-and-trade
policies will be borne by consumers and will place a disproportionately high burden
on poorer families;

WHEREAS, simply reducing carbon emissions in the State of ______ will not have a
significant impact on international carbon reduction, especially while countries like
China, Russia, Mexico, and India emit an ever-increasing amount of carbon into the
atmosphere;

WHEREAS, a tremendous amount of economic growth would be sacrificed for a
reduction in carbon emissions that would have no appreciable impact on global
concentrations of CO2;

WHEREAS, no state or nation has enhanced economic opportunities for its citizens
or increased Gross Domestic Product through cap and trade or other carbon
reduction policies;

and WHEREAS, Europe’s cap and trade system has been undermined by political
favoritism, accounting tricks and has failed to achieve the carbon reduction
targets,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the legislature of the State of ______ urges
the Governor to withdraw [state] from the regional climate initiative."

Ironically, this was approved in St. Louis on April 23, 2010 by committee and approved by the ALEC Bord of Directors in early May of 2010.  Corporate members of ALEC, past and present include:
  • Peabody Energy
  • ExxonMobil
  • Koch Industries (Same one as are affiliated with Tea Party)
  • BP America
  • AmerenUE
  • and hundreds more including many oil, coal, and gas interests.
What I would like to leave readers with is this thought...don't get hung up right now on whether you agree or disagree with the language of this model legislation or any other. Focus on the audacity of our legislators to take the money from these corporations and then introduce the legislation they want introduced.

Call your legislator and demand they disavow the ALEC organization and all for which they stand.



Sunday, July 24, 2011

State of Missouri making progress on the Lewis and Clark Riverside Greenway Trail

A map of Missouri showing Katy Trail State Par...Image via WikipediaJEFFERSON CITY, MO, JULY 22, 2011 – Gov. Jay Nixon announced the new greenway trail project at the Missouri State Penitentiary Redevelopment site and Lewis and Clark State Office Building is moving forward as scheduled.
 
            The Lewis and Clark Riverside Greenway Trail project will connect the Missouri State Penitentiary Redevelopment site with the Jefferson City pedestrian bicycle greenway trail system and ultimately to the Katy Trail State Park.       

            The Missouri Department of Natural Resources provided a $317,060 federal Recreational Trail Program grant to the Office of Administration’s Facilities Management Design and Construction to complete the greenway trail. OA staff are currently completing grading work along the new trail. In addition, OA is accepting bids for the concrete work that will be completed on the trail. OA will be receiving the final bids on Aug. 11. The total cost for the project is $442,560 and is expected to be completed by April 2012.

            "All across Missouri, trails not only provide recreational and educational opportunities, they also are major outdoor attractions that strengthen communities and enhance the local economy," Gov. Jay Nixon said. "This trail represents the solid partnerships between the state and the Jefferson City community to benefit better physical and emotional health, smarter minds and stronger economies."    

            This project will be the first phase of the construction of the greenway trail in the 140 acre Missouri State Penitentiary Redevelopment site. The trail will begin at the parking lot at the east end of the Lewis and Clark State Office building and end at the Ellis Porter/Riverside Park greenway trail.  The trail will follow the established tree line from the Lewis and Clark office building around the Kirchner School for the Severely Handicapped and connect to the Ellis Porter/Riverside Trail and Recreational Area. In addition, there will be a loop trail to an overlook of the Missouri River.     

            "The Lewis and Clark Riverside Greenway Trail will provide a way to expand the greenway trail systems in Jefferson City as well as connect to the Katy Trail State Park and will provide opportunities for healthy recreation, which supports Governor Nixon’s initiative to Get Outdoors," said Bill Bryan, Missouri State Parks Director, a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

            The Recreational Trails Program is a federally funded grant program for trail-related land acquisition, development or restoration. In Missouri, Recreational Trails Program funds are administered by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration.

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Hummingbird banding demonstrations to be held Aug. 6 at Onondaga Cave State Park

Ruby-throated hummingbird public domain USFWAImage via Wikipedia JEFFERSON CITY, MO., JULY 22, 2011 – Take advantage of this unique opportunity to get an up-close look at the ruby-throated hummingbird on Aug. 6 at Onondaga Cave State Park near Leasburg. Join researcher Lanny Chambers between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. as he captures and studies these fascinating little flying machines. Sponsored by Missouri State Parks, these demonstrations will take place at the park’s visitor center and are free and open to the public.


            Researcher Lanny Chambers has been working on a project to track the movement patterns of hummingbirds in Missouri.  He safely captures the birds at the park’s feeders, weighs them, ages them, identifies the gender of each bird and then tags them.  Visitors will learn some general life history information about the ruby-throated hummingbird, which is Missouri’s only summer resident hummer.  Cameras are welcome, however, guests will be instructed to keep an adequate distance from the birds and researchers in order to ensure the safety of the birds.  Future opportunities for these demonstrations will be available in September.

            Onondaga Cave State Park is located seven miles south of the Leasburg exit off of Interstate 44 on Highway H.  For more information about these events, contact the park at 573-245-6576 or the Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf). For more information about Missouri state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. 

Friday, July 22, 2011

MDC presents Master Conservationist award to Bill Crawford

Courtesy Missouri Department of Conservation
Former chief of wildlife research honored for 70 years of conservation work

Written by Rebecca Maples, MDC

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) presented the Master Conservationist award to former MDC Wildlife Research Chief Bill Crawford on July 15 at the Runge Conservation Nature Center.

Crawford has spent more than 70 years working for the conservation of Missouri’s forests, fish and wildlife. A Moberly native, he has been involved with MDC since its beginning. In 1935 he and his father attended the citizens’ meeting that formed the framework for the non-political agency and Conservation Commission that still exist.

Crawford began working for MDC as an aquatic biologist in 1941 when the Department was in its fourth year of existence.

“Everything was new,” Crawford said. “It was an opportunistic time when we could find problems and really start to work on them.”

Crawford travelled throughout the state sharing information about conservation and the Department’s efforts. His work evolved into mentoring and assisting other biologists on a variety of studies. In 1949, due to his diverse experience and expertise, MDC appointed him as the first chief of wildlife research, a position in which he provided leadership for 34 years.

Crawford also cofounded the Missouri Prairie Foundation with longtime friend Don Christisen in 1966 to help protect Missouri’s native grassland habitat and wildlife.

“Every part of Missouri conservation has been touched by Bill Crawford,” said MDC Director Bob Ziehmer. “Mr. Crawford wisely, strategically and productively invested an entire lifetime creating, building and guiding Missouri’s Conservation agency.”

Director Ziehmer presented the award along with Commissioner Emeritus William “Chip” McGeehan, who voted to honor Crawford while serving on the Commission.

The Master Conservationist award is the highest honor given by the Conservation Commission. The Commission established the award in 1941 to honor individuals who have made substantial and lasting contributions to Missouri’s fisheries, forestry or wildlife conservation.

Open house planned Aug. 6 for Lake of the Ozarks State Park

Houses on Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri, USA. M...Image via WikipediaJEFFERSON CITY, MO., JULY 22, 2011 --  Lake of the Ozarks State Park near Kaiser will host an open house to seek public input on Saturday, Aug. 6.  The open house will be held from 7 to 8:15 p.m. in the shelter house located off Hwy. 134 just past the equestrian riding stables and the public is invited to attend. 
 
            The agenda will include recent accomplishments, including the State Parks Youth Corps projects and the new equestrian concession, plus future plans for the park.  Visitors will be invited to share comments on the park’s goals and objectives.

            The open house is part of an ongoing effort to ensure citizens have input on facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.

            Lake of the Ozarks State Park is located in Miller and Camden counties.  People requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling the park directly at 573-648-2696 or by calling the Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf).  For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

7/21 MDC Fishing Report

Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Drawi...Image via Wikipedia
PLEASE CHECK REGULATIONS CAREFULLY: Special regulations may apply to designated portions of water bodies; some baits and lures may not be legal for all portions. 

CENTRAL REGION: (573) 882-8388

LAKES

Binder:

86 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish good on cut bait and stinkbaits; bluegill fair on crickets and worms; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures and plastic frogs; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Blind Pony Lake:

85 degrees, low, dingy; largemouth bass fair on plastic worms; sunfish fair on nightcrawlers; all other species slow; the lake is closed to private boats, and bait held or transported in containers with water is prohibited. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Bagnell Tailwater):

80 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow, try worms, crankbaits, crappie jigs, and light colored soft plastics; white bass fair on light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; catfish fair using crayfish, worms, cut shad and chicken livers. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Glaize):

89 degrees, dingy; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow, try dark colored soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; catfish fair using worms, bluegill and stinkbaits. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Gravois):

89 degrees, dingy; catfish fair on cut baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Niangua):

89 degrees, dingy; crappie fair on minnows; catfish good using cut shad and chicken liver; white bass slow, try spinners; black bass slow, try plastic worms. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Osage):

89 degrees, dingy; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow, try dark colored soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; catfish fair using worms, bluegill and stinkbaits. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Little Dixie:

88 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures; channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and cut bait; bluegill fair on crickets and worms; all other species slow. Area closed to all activity between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

RIVERS

Lamine:

high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Missouri (Middle):

high, muddy; the river is above flood stage, making fishing difficult. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Osage (lower, at Tuscumbia):

80 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow, try worms, crankbaits, crappie jigs, and light colored soft plastics; white bass fair on light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; catfish fair using crayfish, worms, cut shad and chicken livers. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

KANSAS CITY REGION: (816) 655-6254

LAKES

James A. Reed Area:

86 degrees, low, clear; channel catfish fair; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Montrose:

91 degrees, low, dingy; all species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Schell-Osage (Atkinson Lake):

94 degrees, low, clear; all species fair; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Schell-Osage (Schell Lake):

94 degrees, low, clear; all species fair; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Truman:

90 degrees, low, clear; crappie and black bass fair on main lake points using crankbaits and plastic worms; catfish fair using cut bait or shad; white bass and hybrid bass fair using spoons. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Truman Tailwaters:

90 degrees, low, clear; all species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

RIVERS

Missouri River:

high, the river is flooded; all species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

NORTHEAST REGION: (660) 785-2420

LAKES

Hunnewell:

86 degrees, normal, clear; crappie good on Twister Tails and marabou jigs; channel catfish good on stinkbaits; largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Long Branch:

81 degrees, high, clear; channel catfish good on setlines using live bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Mark Twain:

86 degrees, normal, clear; crappie fair on assorted jigs and minnows; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Sever:

89 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish fair on dip baits and liver; crappie fair on minnows in the brush; black bass fair on topwater baits at dawn and dusk; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Thomas Hill:

85 degrees, high, clear; 92 degrees in warm water arm; channel catfish fair on liver and nightcrawlers; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

RIVERS

Mississippi (above St. Louis):

84 degrees, falling, dingy; channel catfish good on stinkbaits and nightcrawlers; flathead catfish good on live bait; drum good on nightcrawlers; carp good on doughbait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Salt (below Mark Twain):

76 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

NORTHWEST REGION: (816) 271-3100

LAKES

Bilby Ranch Lake:

84 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass fair on topwater lures; channel catfish good on liver; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Mozingo:

85 degrees, normal, clear; black bass good in low light hours on topwater lures and plastics; crappie good on jigs over deeper brush; channel catfish good on cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Paho:

84 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish fair on prepared baits and nightcrawlers in late evening; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Pony Express:

83 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish good on chicken liver; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Smithville:

82 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

RIVERS

Grand:

72 degrees, falling, muddy; channel catfish and blue catfish good, all other species fair. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Missouri (below Iowa line):

82 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

OZARK REGION: (417) 255-9561

LAKES

Bull Shoals (East):

85 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish fair on trotlines and limb lines; black bass fair on topwater lures. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Norfork:

84 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish fair on trotlines and limb lines. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

RIVERS

Big Piney (lower, Pulaski Co.):

82 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on jigs and soft plastic baits. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Big Piney (Upper):

78 degrees, low, clear; black bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastic baits and live baits early and late in the day. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Bryant Creek:

80 degrees, low, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastics. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Current:

79 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastics. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Eleven Point:

62 degrees, normal, clear; rainbow trout good on corn and minnows; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Gasconade (middle, Pulaski Co.):

82 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastic baits and jigs; channel catfish fair on live bait. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Gasconade (upper):

88 degrees, low, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Jacks Fork:

79 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastics and Beetle Spins. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

North Fork:

72 degrees, low, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastic baits. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

SOUTHEAST REGION: (573) 290-5858

LAKES

Clearwater Lake:

88 degrees, clear; largemouth bass fair late evening and early morning on topwater lures; channel catfish fair at night on trotlines. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Council Bluff:

87 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish fair on liver and worms after dark; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Cypress Lake:

87 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish good in 2'-3' depths using crickets, worms, and stinkbait; crappie slow in 3' depths using minnows and jigs; bluegill and redear sunfish fair in 1'-3' depths using crickets, small jigs, and small pieces of worms; largemouth bass slow in 2'-3' depths on spinnerbaits and jigs; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Duck Creek:

88 degrees, high, clear; bluegill and redear sunfish good on crickets; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Lake Girardeau:

86 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish fair on worms; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Perry County Lake:

91 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish fair on worms, liver, stinkbait and live sunfish; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Robert DeLaney Lake:

86 degrees, normal, channel catfish fair on worms, liver, stinkbait and live sunfish; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Wappapello:

normal, black bass fair early and late on spinnerbaits and plastic worms; crappie fair on minnows and jigs; bluegill good on crickets and worms; channel catfish fair on trotlines and jug lines at night using live bait and nightcrawlers; crappie fair in spillway on minnows and jigs. Anglers should note the 9" minimum length regulation for crappie on Wappapello Lake. All areas around the lake are now open since the lake water level has dropped. Call the Wappapello Lake Recreation Hotline for updates at 573-222-8139. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

RIVERS

Black River (near Annapolis):

80 degrees, normal, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Castor River (above Zalma):

low, clear; black bass good on minnows; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Lower Black River (Clearwater Dam):

high, dingy; crappie good on minnows; bluegill good on worms; black bass fair on worms and topwater lures; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Mississippi (below Charleston):

high, muddy; channel catfish and blue catfish good on cut baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Mississippi River (Cape Girardeau):

high, muddy; channel catfish and blue catfish good on cut baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

St. Francis (above Wappapello):

low, clear; largemouth and smallmouth bass good in morning and evening on topwater lures; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

St. Francis (below Wappapello):

80 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on stinkbait and chicken liver; flathead catfish good on live bait, sunfish and goldfish; bluegill fair on waxworms; black bass fair on artificial bait and spinnerbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

SOUTHWEST REGION: (417) 895-6881

LAKES

Bull Shoals (West):

78-83 degrees, high, clear; Dam/Swan Creek area: black bass fair on jigs, soft plastics, and nightcrawlers; striped bass fair on large swimbait, jerkbait, and shad; walleye fair on nightcrawlers and jerkbaits; Beaver Creek area: black bass good on jigs, soft plastics and nightcrawlers; catfish fair on nightcrawlers; walleye fair on nightcrawlers and jerkbait; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Lake Taneycomo:

57 degrees, normal, clear; trout good on shrimp, nightcrawlers, corn, and orange or bubblegum colored Power Baits, scuds and San Juan worms, black/olive marabou jigs or black/white Rooster Tails also working well. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Pomme de Terre:

86 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on plastic baits on points and around structure in 10' to 15' of water; crappie good on minnows in 15' of water around standing trees and structure; catfish good on trotlines and jug lines using live bait; bluegill good on nightcrawlers in 10' of water; all other species fair. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Stockton:

86 degrees, normal, crappie good on minnows in 15'-20' of water near brush piles or while trolling along flats and around points; catfish good while fishing over brush piles and along flats; walleye good on jigs and nightcrawlers around points and flats in 18' of water; black bass good on large worms in 16'-20' of water; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Table Rock (James River arm):

84 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms in 10'-15' around bridge piers and standing timber in clear water; black bass fair on crankbaits that dive between 6'-14', large 10"-12" purple plastic worms Carolina or Texas rigged are working best; white bass fair on bright colored topwater lures or shallow diving lures in the evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/19/2011)

Table Rock (main lake):

84 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms 10'-15' around bridge piers and standing timber in clear water; black bass fair dragging jigs on points and using crankbaits that dive 6'-14' deep or using plastic worms, Carolina or Texas rigged are best; white bass fair in evenings using topwater lures or shallow diving lures, bright colors best; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/19/2011)

RIVERS

Big Niangua:

71 degrees, normal, clear; black bass fair on soft plastics; goggle-eye fair on soft plastics and jigs; trout fair on natural baits and Power Baits below Bennett Spring; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

James River (lower):

87 degrees, normal, clear; black bass fair on crankbaits off points and Texas rigged with live worms and dark colored soft plastic baits; catfish good on cut bait and nightcrawlers, use trotline at night; crappie fair around brush piles on jigs and minnows; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

ST. LOUIS REGION: (636) 300-1953

LAKES

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lake 33:

87 degrees, normal, dingy; bluegill fair on worms; black bass fair on minnows; channel catfish good on doughbaits and blood baits; please remove your litter. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lakes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 23:

88 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on doughbaits and blood baits; limit 4; please remove litter. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

RIVERS

Big River:

81 degrees, high, muddy; channel catfish good on cut bait, 4" bluegill and worms; black bass slow on minnows; crappie slow on minnows; bluegill fair on crickets; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Bourbeuse (middle, lower, Franklin Co.):

81 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish slow on worms and blood baits; black bass slow on plastic worms; bluegill good on worms; all other species fair on natural baits. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Meramec (above Sullivan, Crawford Co.):

84 degrees, falling, clear; black bass good on plastic worms; channel catfish fair on stinkbait and worms; goggle-eye, bluegill and sunfish good on worms and crickets; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Meramec (below Eureka):

81 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish fair on natural baits; black bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Missouri (below New Haven):

81 degrees, high, muddy; channel catfish good on worms and prepared baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

TROUT PARKS:

Bennett Spring State Park:

54 degrees, the spring level is near normal; Zone 1 and 2 best lures: red colored and red with green head colored brassies, John Deere colored mini jigs, ginger colored and brown colored bead head Cracklebacks, gingersnap with 8 oz. gold head colored, red and black colored, pink and white colored and salmon and brown colored marabou jigs, green and black with a gold spinner and black colored with a silver spinner Rooster Tails, shrimp colored, chartreuse colored and red and white colored glo balls, red colored and olive colored brassies; Zone 3 best lures: salmon peach colored and yellow colored Power Baits, pink colored and fluorescent orange colored worms, and salmon eggs. Fishing hours for July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. We will be cutting weeds on August 2 and 3. We will begin around 8:00 a.m. and finish around 3:00 p.m. Thank you for your patience. (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Maramec Spring Park:

58 degrees, fishing is good; the water is clear with good flow; dough and putty baits are producing good numbers when fished free floating or underneath a float; feather jigs in black/yellow, olive, white, and pink are producing good numbers of fish; fishing hours for the month of July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Women's Free Fishing Day is September 10th. (Report made on 7/21/2011)

Montauk State Park:

58 degrees, the river level is normal; the water is clear; fishing is good on most baits; dough and putty baits are working well, as are flies, Rooster Tails and jigs; the best fishing is during the morning and evening hours. Fishing hours for July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. We recently cut vegetation in the lake and spring branch of the river. For up-to-date stream conditions check http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440 (Report made on 7/20/2011)

Roaring River State Park:

58 degrees, the water is clear and normal; fishing has been very good early in the day, late in the evening and shady spots during the day; dry fly fishing is excellent right now; cheese yellow, white fluorescent, orange and brown colors in plastic eggs and worms working well; black, brown, olive and white spinners working well; small crankbaits are working well; marabou and micro jigs are good; olive, white, black/yellow and tan are good; in Zone 3: nightcrawlers, minnows and corn, white, orange or fluorescent yellow Power Bait paste is working well. (Report made on 7/21/2011)