Thursday, June 30, 2011

MDC 6/30/2011 Fishing Report

PLEASE CHECK REGULATIONS CAREFULLY: Special regulations may apply to designated portions of water bodies; some baits and lures may not be legal for all portions.

CENTRAL REGION (573) 882-8388

LAKES

Binder: 81 degrees, normal, dingy; largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and topwater lures; bluegill good on crickets and red worms; channel catfish fair on stinkbaits and nightcrawlers; all other species slow.




(Report made on 6/30/2011)

Blind Pony Lake: 75 degrees, low, dingy; largemouth bass good on plastic worms and topwater lures; sunfish fair on nightcrawlers; all other species slow; the lake is closed to private boats, and bait held or transported in containers with water is prohibited. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Bagnell Tailwater): 69 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass slow, try worms and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on cut baits, stinkbaits, chicken livers and worms.
(Report made on 6/29/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Glaize): 83 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on worms, cut baits, and stinkbaits.
(Report made on 6/29/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Gravois): 83 degrees, dingy; catfish fair on cut baits; all other species slow.

(Report made on 6/29/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Niangua): 83 degrees, muddy; catfish good on cut shad and live bait; crappie fair on minnows;
white bass fair on spinners; black bass fair on plastic worms.
(Report made on 6/29/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Osage): 83 degrees, dingy; catfish good on cut shad and live bait; crappie fair on minnows;
white bass fair on spinners; black bass fair on plastic worms.
(Report made on 6/29/2011)

Little Dixie: 75 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on topwater lures; bluegill good on crickets; all other species slow. Area closed to all activity between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

RIVERS

Lamine: high, muddy; flathead catfish and channel catfish fair on setlines baited with live bluegill and small creek chubs upstream; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Missouri (Middle): high, muddy; flathead catfish fair in tributaries on live bait; blue and channel catfish fair on live bait and cut bait; all other species slow. The Missouri river is extremely high and fishing is not recommended at this time except in the tributaries. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Osage (lower, at Tuscumbia): 69 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass slow, try worms and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on cut baits, stinkbaits, chicken livers and worms.
(Report made on 6/29/2011)

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KANSAS CITY REGION (816) 655-6254

LAKES

James A. Reed Area: 81 degrees, clear; full pool; largemouth bass, channel catfish, crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish fair; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Montrose: 82 degrees, normal, clear; black bass fair; all other species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Schell-Osage (Atkinson Lake): 82 degrees, clear; catfish good; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Schell-Osage (Schell Lake): 83 degrees, clear; catfish good; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Truman: 81 degrees, normal, clear; crappie fair on main lake points using jigs and minnows; black bass fair on main lake points using crankbaits and plastic worms; catfish fair using cut bait or shad; white bass and hybrid bass fair using spoons. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Truman Tailwaters: 81 degrees, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

RIVERS

Missouri River: high, the river is flooded; all species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

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NORTHEAST REGION (660) 785-2420

LAKES

Hunnewell: 75 degrees, normal, clear; crappie fair on marabou jigs; channel catfish fair on chicken liver; largemouth bass fair on Hot-n-Tots; bluegill fair on earthworms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Long Branch: 74 degrees, high, dingy; crappie fair on jigs and minnows; channel catfish fair on leeches and stinkbaits along Hwy. AX; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Mark Twain: 82 degrees, high, dingy; crappie fair on assorted jigs and minnows; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers and cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Sever: 80 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on hot dogs, stinkbaits and liver; crappie fair on minnows; black bass fair on crankbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Thomas Hill: 82 degrees, high, muddy; water temperature 88 degrees at warm water boat dock; all species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

RIVERS

Mississippi (above St. Louis): 71 degrees, high, muddy; at flood stage; access difficult due to flooding; flathead catfish good on live baits; blue catfish good on cut bait; drum good on nightcrawlers; carp good on nightcrawlers; sturgeon good on nightcrawlers; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Salt (below Mark Twain): 74 degrees, high, muddy; water levels are fluctuating day to day; all species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

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NORTHWEST REGION (816) 271-3100

LAKES

Bilby Ranch Lake: 72 degrees, normal, clear; black bass good on plastics; channel catfish good on liver; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Mozingo: 72 degrees, normal, clear; crappie good in woody coves or over deeper brush on jigs or minnows, black bass good, some fish moving deep; channel catfish fair on cut bait; walleye fair on crankbaits or crawler harnesses on channel breaks or weed lines. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Paho: 72 degrees, rising, dingy; hybrid striped bass good on crappie jigs; channel catfish good on prepared baits in flooded willows and grasses; largemouth bass good on plastic artificials in flooded cover; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Pony Express: 74 degrees, high, dingy; all species fair. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Smithville: 75 degrees, normal, muddy; crappie good in 10'-12' of water with the best catches reported over brush piles with blue/white/chartreuse jigs and/or minnows; largemouth bass fair in shallows on a wide variety of lures including spinners, stickbaits and jigs; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers, shad, and prepared baits; white bass slow; walleye fair on jigs, worms, or rattle baits on flat lake points. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

RIVERS

Grand: 69 degrees, rising, dingy; channel catfish and blue catfish fair; flathead catfish slow; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Missouri (below Iowa line): 72 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow; all recreational boating has been restricted by the U.S. Coast Guard from Iowa line to St. Joseph. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

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OZARK REGION (417) 255-9561

LAKES

Bull Shoals (East): 85 degrees, high, dingy; black bass fair on soft plastics; catfish fair on limb lines and trotlines; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Norfork: 85 degrees, high, dingy; black bass fair on soft plastics; catfish fair on limb lines and trotlines; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

RIVERS

Big Piney (lower, Pulaski Co.): 78 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on jigs and soft plastic baits. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Big Piney (Upper): 75 degrees, low, clear; black bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastics; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Bryant Creek: 73 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastics; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Current: 78 degrees, normal, clear; all species good on plastics. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Eleven Point: 60 degrees, normal, clear; rainbow trout good on corn and minnows; all other species good on plastics. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Gasconade (middle, Pulaski Co.): 79 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastic baits and jigs. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Gasconade (upper): 83 degrees, normal, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Jacks Fork: 79 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass good on spinnerbaits; goggle-eye good on soft plastics. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

North Fork: 68 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastic baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

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SOUTHEAST REGION (573) 290-5858

LAKES

Clearwater Lake: 84 degrees, high, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Council Bluff: 79 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on dark colored soft plastics during low light periods; channel catfish fair on liver; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Cypress Lake: 81 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish good in 2'-3' depths using crickets, worms, and stinkbait; crappie fair in 3' depths using minnows and jigs; bluegill and redear sunfish good in 1'-3' depths using crickets, small jigs, and small pieces of worms; largemouth bass fair in 2'-3' depths on spinnerbaits and jigs; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Duck Creek: 85 degrees, high, clear; largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Lake Girardeau: 76 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers; bluegill and black bass fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Perry County Lake: 82 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish good on liver and worms; black bass good on crankbaits; sunfish fair on red wigglers; hybrid striped bass slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Robert DeLaney Lake: 81 degrees, normal, channel catfish good on worms, liver, live bluegill, and stinkbait; flathead catfish good on live bluegill; bluegill fair on crickets and waxworms; black bass and crappie fair on jigs and live bait; all other species slow. Catfish success after dark has increased in recent weeks. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Wappapello: high, bluegill good on crickets and worms; crappie fair on minnows and jigs; black bass fair early and late on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; channel catfish fair on trotlines using live bait and nightcrawlers. Anglers should note the 9" minimum length regulation for crappie on Wappapello Lake. Call the Wappapello Lake Recreation Hotline for updates at 573-222-8139. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

RIVERS

Black River (near Annapolis): 77 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish fair on stinkbait and chicken liver; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye slow on artificial baits. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Castor River (above Zalma): normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on minnows; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Lower Black River (Clearwater Dam): high, muddy; black bass fair in backwater areas on minnows and jigs; channel catfish fair on worms and live bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Mississippi (below Charleston): rising, dingy; channel catfish fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Mississippi River (Cape Girardeau): high, muddy; channel catfish fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

St. Francis (above Wappapello): high, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

St. Francis (below Wappapello): 78 degrees, high, muddy; black bass good on artificial bait; channel catfish fair on liver, worms and stinkbait; flathead catfish fair on live goldfish and bluegill; bluegill fair on waxworms, nightcrawlers, and crickets; crappie fair on minnows and crickets; . (Report made on 6/29/2011)

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SOUTHWEST REGION (417) 895-6881

LAKES

Bull Shoals (West): 75-79 degrees, high, clear; Dam/Swan Creek area: black bass good on jigs, soft plastics, and nightcrawlers; striped bass good on large swimbait and jerkbaits; white bass fair on swimming minnows; walleye fair on nightcrawlers and jerkbaits; Beaver Creek area: black bass good on jigs, soft plastics and nightcrawlers; walleye fair on nightcrawlers and jerkbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/28/2011)

Lake Taneycomo: 51 degrees, normal, clear; trout good on flies and black, white, and olive colored marabou jigs or fluorescent orange, chartreuse, and bubblegum colored Power Baits, nightcrawlers and corn. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Pomme de Terre: 80 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on plastic worms and crankbaits; crappie good on minnows or jigs around structure in 15' of water; walleye good while trolling or drifting; catfish good on live bait or cut baits using trotlines or on pole and line. (Report made on 6/28/2011)

Stockton: 77 degrees, normal, clear; catfish good on fresh shad on flats; black bass good on soft plastic worms and spinners in 20' of water; crappie good on jigs and while trolling in 30' of water; walleye good on jigs and nightcrawlers on flats or points in 15' to 25' of water; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Table Rock (James River arm): 84 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms in 10' to 15' of water around bridge piers and standing timber in clear water; black bass fair on green 1 oz. jigs with a purple/brown trailer while dragging on points in 6' to 10' of water, large 10" to 12" purple plastic worms Carolina or Texas rigged are working well; white bass fair on topwater lures or shallow diving lures in bright colors in the evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

Table Rock (main lake): 84.5 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms in 10' to 15' of water around bridge piers and standing timber in clear water; black bass fair on green 1 oz. jigs with a purple/brown trailer while dragging on points in 6' to 10' of water, large 10" to 12" purple plastic worms Carolina or Texas rigged are working well; white bass fair on topwater lures or shallow diving lures in bright colors in the evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

RIVERS

Big Niangua: 66 degrees, high, clear; trout fair, best on natural baits and Power Baits below Bennett Spring; black bass slow, best on soft plastics; goggle-eye fair on soft plastics and jigs; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

James River (lower): 83 degrees, normal, clear; goggle-eye good on minnows and spinners and on Road Runners in the streams; black bass fair on nightcrawlers and crankbaits off the points; catfish fair on cut baits and nightcrawlers using trotlines and limb lines; crappie fair on jigs and minnows. (Report made on 6/29/2011)

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ST. LOUIS REGION (636) 300-1953

LAKES

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lake 33: 80 degrees, normal, dingy; bluegill fair on natural baits; black bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; please remove your litter. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lakes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 23: 80 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on blood baits; limit 4; bluegill fair on natural baits; black bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; please remove litter.


(Report made on 6/30/2011)

RIVERS

Big River: 78 degrees, rising, muddy; channel catfish good on cut bait; black bass fair on minnows; crappie slow on minnows; bluegill fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Bourbeuse (middle, lower, Franklin Co.): 75 degrees, normal, muddy; channel catfish fair on doughbait, worms and blood bait; black bass fair on plastic worms; bluegill good on worms; all other species slow on worms.
(Report made on 6/30/2011)

Meramec (above Sullivan, Crawford Co.): 78 degrees, high, dingy; black bass fair on plastics; channel catfish fair on natural baits; carp good on doughbait; drum good on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Meramec (below Eureka): 72 degrees, high, dingy; black bass fair on plastics; channel catfish fair on natural baits; carp good on doughbait; drum good on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Missouri (below New Haven): 72 degrees, rising, muddy; channel catfish fair on worms and prepared bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

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TROUT PARKS

Bennett Spring State Park: 54 degrees, the spring level is near normal; Zone 1 and 2 best lures: John Deere colored mini jigs, ginger colored and brown colored bead head Cracklebacks, gingersnap with 8 oz. gold head colored, red and black colored, pink and white colored and salmon and brown colored marabou jigs, green and black with a gold spinner and black colored with a silver spinner Rooster Tails, shrimp colored, chartreuse colored and red and white colored glo balls, red colored and olive colored brassies; Zone 3 best lures: white with glitter colored and yellow with glitter colored Power Baits, white colored Trout Nip and salmon eggs. Fishing hours for July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Maramec Spring Park: 57 degrees, fishing is good; the water is clear with good flow; dough and putty baits are producing good numbers when fished free floating or underneath a float; feather jigs in black/yellow, olive, white, and pink are producing good numbers of fish; fishing hours for the month of July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Montauk State Park: 58 degrees, the river level is normal; the water is clear; fishing is good on most baits; dough and putty baits are working well, as are flies and jigs; the best fishing is during the morning and evening hours. Fishing hours for July are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.


For up-to-date stream conditions check http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440 (Report made on 6/30/2011)

Roaring River State Park: 58 degrees, the river is clear and running normal; fishing has been very good; plastic worms and power eggs are working very well; use scented baits in zones allowed; spinners are good; Rooster Tail-type spinners in black, brown, olive and bright orange have all been good; nightcrawlers and minnows are good in Zone 3.

(Report made on 6/29/2011)
 

Swimming beaches at four state parks temporarily closed following heavy rainfall, bacteria levels Two others closed due to storm, flooding damage

JEFFERSON CITY, MO, JUNE 29, 2011 – Heavy rainfall earlier this week likely contributed to high bacteria levels confirmed at four state park swimming beaches, according to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Swimming beaches at Cuivre River and Finger Lakes state parks have been closed because the results of water samples taken Monday showed bacteria levels above the department’s standard for state park beaches.

Grand Glaize Beach at Lake of the Ozarks State Park, also known as Public Beach #2, remains closed because of elevated bacteria levels. Visitors to the park can still enjoy the park’s Public Beach #1, which is located in Kaiser. All other facilities at Lake of the Ozarks State Park are also open and available to visitors.

Even though the bacteria levels at Mark Twain State Park were well below the department’s single-sample standard for bacteria, the beach has been closed because the overall geometric mean exceeds the department’s standard for state park beaches.

The water at all designated beaches in the state park system is sampled weekly during the recreational season by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources to determine suitability for swimming. Water quality can be determined to be unsuitable for swimming based on either the single sample taken earlier in the week, or by the geometric mean, which is a mathematical value that takes into consideration results from the current week plus previous weeks.

The sample test results indicate a snap shot of the water quality taken at the beaches at a specific time; however, a single sample does not provide an overall sense of the water quality in the lake where the beach is located. Water samples are taken to check for E. coli, a common indicator species for bacteria.

Higher bacteria levels are often associated with heavy rains that result in runoff from adjacent lands. All of the parks affected by closings this week were in the path of thunderstorms Sunday and early Monday that dropped considerable rainfall.

Once tests indicate the bacteria levels are within the standard suitable for swimming, the beaches will reopen. Information about current status of beaches is available on the website at http://bit.ly/MoStateParksBeachStatus as well as mostateparks.com. Signs indicating the status of the beaches are posted at the beaches as well.

The beaches at Wakonda and Lake Wappapello state parks are temporarily closed due to earlier storm debris or flooding. Lewis and Clark State Park, including its beach, is closed because of high water. Most of the other facilities at these parks remain open and available to the public. A list of facility advisories is available at mostateparks.com.

Missouri's state parks and historic sites offer something to suit everyone's taste - outdoor adventure, great scenery and a bit of history. With Missouri’s 85 state parks and historic sites, the possibilities are boundless.

For more information about Missouri state parks and historic sites and swimming beaches, visit mostateparks.com.

Listing Ozark chinquapin under Endangered Species Act ‘not warranted’

Ozark Chinquapin Trail StreamImage by gmeador via FlickrThe Ozark chinquapin is a medium-sized tree which once grew to 65 feet, but now rarely reaches heights of more than 30 feet.  It develops from stump sprouts as well as seeds, but in recent years, new growth is generally from sprouts due to chestnut blight disease.
Chestnut blight has posed a long term threat to the Ozark chinquapin since 1940.  Due to the life history traits of the Ozark chinquapin, it appears that cross pollination and production of seeds is not uncommon. Based on the documented widespread distribution and abundance of Ozark chinquapin and its life history traits, chestnut blight does not threaten the continued existence of Ozark chinquapin at this time or in the foreseeable future.

The Service announced its decision today in the Federal Register, after conducting a comprehensive, range-wide, scientific review of the species’ current status, known as a 12-month finding.  On January 6, 2004, Mr. Joe Glenn, a private citizen from Hodgen, Oklahoma, filed a petition requesting the listing of the Ozark chinquapin as candidate species under the ESA.  On June 1, 2010, the Service published an initial finding that the petition presented substantial information indicating the requested action may be warranted in the Federal Register.

However, the status review indicated the species is currently widespread on both public and private lands throughout its current range.  Individual location records commonly report multiple sprout clumps, and these vary from tens to thousands of individual sprout clumps per site record.

In addition, the majority of Ozark chinquapin populations are found on state and federal lands which are being managed to benefit the species. Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas uses periodic, prescribed fire for habitat restoration on Sugarloaf Mountain, the only site in the park with a population of Ozark chinquapin. At Buffalo National River in Arkansas the National Park Service is conducting a habitat restoration study to determine the best soil types for Ozark chinquapin populations.  The National Park Service also is working with an arborist to gather seeds from trees at Buffalo National River that are seemingly unaffected by chestnut blight for propagation.  The U.S. Forest Service lists Ozark chinquapin as a sensitive species and provides specific protection guidelines in its land management plans.
The Service will accept any pertinent, new information regarding the Ozark chinquapin’s population status or threats to its habitat.  Please contact Chris Davidson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arkansas Ecological Services Field Office, 110 South Amity Road, Suite 300, Conway, Arkansas 72032.

For more information about the Service’s finding on Ozark chinquapin, please see www.fws.gov/arkansas-es/castanea.html.
The mission of the Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information, please visit the Service’s websites at http://www.fws.gov/southeast/ or www.fws.gov.

Skeet shooting featured July 9 at Arrow Rock State Historic Site

Matthew Dryke competes in the skeet shooting e...Image via Wikipedia
JEFFERSON CITYMO., JUNE 29, 2011 -- Learn the basics of shotgun and skeet shooting at an event July 9 at Arrow Rock State Historic Site in Arrow Rock. The free program will include two sessions with the morning session from 9 a.m. to noon and the afternoon session from 1 to 4 p.m.
            Brian Flowers from the Missouri Department of Conservation will present the program, which will begin with a firearms safety lesson and advance into proper fit of a shotgun, proper stance and shooting techniques. All participants will have the opportunity to practice by shooting a variety of clay birds thrown from a clay bird trailer. There will be youth and adult guns on hand for everyone to try.
            Eye and ear protection, shells and clay birds will be provided. Participants are welcome to bring their own shotgun and should bring a lawn chair or something to sit on while the class is being taught.
            Please call the Arrow Rock State Historic Site in advance to register at 660-837-3330. Arrow Rock State Historic Site is located at 4th and Van Buren streets in Arrow Rock. For more information on state parks and historic sites, call the Missouri Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf) or visit mostateparks.com.

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Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Two anglers score hits on open fishing records

This is a picture of the Meramec River as it f...Image via Wikipedia
JEFFERSON CITY–Two Missourians succeeded in quests for state fishing records. One says he aspires to a higher calling.
The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) recently certified a gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) gigged by Hayden Crouch, Bradleyville, as the first state record for that species. Crouch, 12, was gigging with his family on Beaver Creek in Taney County on Jan. 15 when he stuck the 15-inch gizzard shad. It weighed 1.5 pounds. According to The Fishes of Missouri, the Show-Me State’s definitive text on the finned tribe, most gizzard shad weigh less than a pound.
Gizzard shad live in big, constantly moving schools in most of the state’s lakes and principal streams. This member of the herring family is one of Missouri’s most prolific fish. Their soft, flavorless flesh makes them more desirable as cut bait than as food. However, Crouch and his family had other reasons for wanting to catch a big gizzard shad. The species was on their list of fish for which they might reasonably hope to set a state record.
MDC keeps two sets of fishing records. One is for fish caught on a hand-held pole and line. The other category is for “alternative methods,” including gigging. The Crouches knew the alternative-methods record for gizzard shad was “open.” No one had ever bothered to apply for it. All the Crouches had to do was gig one and enter it for a guaranteed record. Hayden edged out other family members by gigging the biggest gizzard shad that night.
Derek S. DePew, of DeSoto, had the same plan when he entered a bowfishing tournament on the Meramec River May 21. He made a list of fish he might encounter during the outing and weights of current alternative-methods records for those species. He noted that the record for the highfin carpsucker (Carpiodes velifer) was open.
The Fishes of Missouri describes the highfin carpsucker as rare, with known populations only in the Meramec, Gasconade, Osage and White river systems. One distinguishing feature is the extremely long filament on the front of the dorsal fin.
DePew had done his homework, but he needed something more to land his record fish – lightning reflexes. A big highfin carpsucker was among dozens of fish that began leaping wildly around his boat when he cruised into a shallow spot on the river. Seeing the long filament on the fish’s dorsal fin, DePew recognized immediately what it might be and loosed his arrow, piercing the fish in midair.
Since the alternative-methods record for the species was open, DePew got an automatic record when Conservation Agent Chris Boyd verified the fish’s species. DePew set the bar high for future records. His fish weighed 1 pound, 6 ounces and was 15 inches long. According to The Fishes of Missouri, highfin carpsuckers seldom grow larger than a pound or longer than 12 inches.
Highfin carpsuckers prefer clearer, cleaner streams than their close and much more widely distributed relatives, the river carpsucker (Carpiodes carpio) and the quillback (Carpiodes cyprinus). Like the gizzard shad, the highfin carpsucker is known for jumping out of the water.
Now that he has a state record, DePew said he plans to focus his efforts on reducing the number of invasive silver carp in Missouri streams. On July 30, the Missouri Metro Bowfishing Club will sponsor the Riverends Silver Carp Roundup at George Winter County Park in Fenton. The tournament will run from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and will recognize only Asian carp. Contact DePew at 636-524-3016 or Robert North at 314-420-5439 for further information.
“I want to see if we can put a dent in the millions of invasive carp in our streams,” said DePew. “If enough people get interested in harvesting them, it could help. It can’t hurt.”
A list of current state records, plus entry the fishing-record entry form are available at http://mdc.mo.gov/fishing/reports/records. Information about invasive carp is available at www.mdc.mo.gov/node/10244/.
-Jim Low-

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Bring your ideas to an informational meeting at Watkins Woolen Mill State Park and State Historic Site

JEFFERSON CITY, MO, JUNE 28, 2011 -- The public is invited to bring their ideas to an informational meeting on Wednesday, July 6 at the Watkins Woolen Mill State Park and State Historic Site near Lawson.  The informational meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in the visitor center and museum and the public is invited to attend.
Recent accomplishments at the park and future plans will be highlighted during the informational meeting. These include proposed additional improvements to the bicycle and walking trail. Visitors are invited to share comments on the park's services and operations.
This informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort to ensure citizens have input on facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.
Watkins Woolen Mill State Park and State Historic Site is located off Interstate 35, seven miles east of Kearney, off Highway 92 on Highway RA.  
People requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling the park at 816-580-3387 or by calling the Missouri Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf).  For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com.

Monday, June 27, 2011

Department of Natural Resources awards $19,175 to the Greenway Network

JEFFERSON CITY, MO, JUNE 23, 2011 –The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has awarded $19,175 to the Greenway Network Inc. to develop a watershed management plan for the Watkins Creek sub-watershed in northeastern St. Louis County.

            Watkins Creek is on the Missouri 2010 list of impaired waters for bacteria and chlorides caused by pollution from stormwater runoff.  The watershed includes the communities of Black Jack, Glasgow Village, Spanish Lake and Bellefontaine Neighbors.  Watkins Creek is a modified tributary to the Mississippi River emerging some 5.7 miles west of its confluence and located in a suburban area.  Due to rapid growth in the Watkins Creek Watershed, the stream is severely degraded and instable.  The creek continues to adjust to accommodate the increased stormwater delivered to it.

            The watershed management plan will help protect and improve water quality in the Watkins Creek sub-watershed by identifying pollutant sources, recommending conservation practices, setting goals and a timeline, and establishing a monitoring program.  The Greenway Network will work with local partners to assist and coordinate planning efforts to develop the watershed management plan.  The grant will help fund public planning meetings, personnel expenses and watershed assessments activities.

            The Greenway Network will provide a match contribution of $13,650 over the life of the project bringing the total cost to $32,825.  The project is expected to be completed by June 30, 2012.
Partners in this collaborative effort include The Confluence Project, Missouri American Water Company, Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District and East-West Gateway Coordinating Council.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Region 7 has provided partial funding for this project under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act.  The Department of Natural Resources’ Water Protection Program will administer the grant funds.  The department is committed to working closely with communities and businesses to assist with funding efforts that improve water quality in Missouri.  For more information, contact the Water Protection Program at P.O. Box 176, Jefferson City, MO 65102 or call 800-361-4827 or 573-751-1300.

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Sunday, June 26, 2011

Doniphan receives $10,000 to develop environmental project

Runoff flowing into a stormwater drainImage via Wikipedia
JEFFERSON CITYMO, JUNE 23, 2011 – The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has awarded Doniphan a $10,000 grant to reduce pollution from stormwater runoff at the city’s Quick CreekPark.
The Quick Creek Park Environmental Education Project will involve implementing conservation practices focused on reducing pollution from stormwater runoff.  The purpose of such an initiative will not only be to preserve and restore the environment, but also to focus upon education by involving school and community groups in the project.
The project aims to restore native vegetation such as trees, shrubs and native grasses and wildflowers to the site.  It will also demonstrate the effectiveness and ease of managing stormwater runoff using rain gardens, and develop a lawn nutrient management plan based on soil testing for proper fertilization of the athletic fields.
The community will be invited to participate in the project.  The city intends to involve school groups, construct outdoor learning classrooms and implement educational activities for community events such as Earth Day and Arbor Day.
These activities will educate residents, landowners, citizens and businesses about pollutants from stormwater runoff, and promote their involvement in best management practices in the watershed. They will also learn what technical resources are available to assist them in implementing such activities.
The city of Doniphan and partners will provide a match contribution of $6,670 during the life of the project bringing the total cost of the project to $16,670.  Contributing partners in this collaborative effort include the Doniphan High School, local civic groups, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Stream Team volunteers and the University of Missouri-Extension.  Projectcompletion is expected by April 30, 2013. 
            The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 7 has provided partial funding for this project under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act.  The Department of Natural Resources’ Water Protection Program will administer the grant funds.  The department is committed to working closely with communities and businesses to assist with funding efforts that improve water quality in Missourias well as provide a financial savings For more information, contact the Water Protection Program atP.O. Box 176Jefferson CityMO 65102 or call 800-361-4827 or 573-751-1300.

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Saturday, June 25, 2011

Bullfrogs and green frogs up for grabs June 30

Bullfrog - Rana catesbeianaImage via Wikipedia
Missouri’s annual frogging season runs from June 30 to Oct. 31.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Bullfrogs and green frogs are up for grabs beginning at sunset on June 30 as Missouri enters its annual frogging season.

A favorite outdoor pastime of many Missourians, frogging spans the gap between hunting and fishing. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) allows harvest of frogs by hand net, gig, trotline, throw line, limb line, bank line, jug line, snagging, snaring, grabbing or pole and line with a fishing permit. With a hunting permit, frogs can be harvested using .22-caliber firearms, pellet guns, atlatls, longbows and crossbows. The use of an artificial light is permitted when frogging. Children under the age of 16 and adults over 65 are not required to have a permit.

The daily limit is an eight-frog total of both species, with a possession limit of 16. If you catch eight before midnight, you can start frogging again at 12:01 a.m. and catch another day’s limit. To do this legally, the first eight frogs must be kept separate from the second set.

Once a frog is speared, it must be harvested. You should not release an injured frog, as the animal is not likely to recover. However, a frog is not fatally injured by methods such as grabbing or pole and line and thus may be released.

Frog legs have a mild flavor similar to that of fish. They can be battered and fried or sautéed in butter with garlic or herbs. They also make a good base for Cajun dishes that call for fish or shellfish. To top off your frogging experience, try this basic frying recipe:

Fried Frog Legs

Ingredients:
1 cup flour
1 cup crushed saltine crackers
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon season salt
1 tablespoon lemon pepper salt
2 eggs
1 cup milk
2 quarts peanut oil

Instructions:
Thaw a possession limit of frog legs (16 pairs), drain and pat dry with paper towels. Heat oil to 375 degrees. Combine dry ingredients in a large plastic bowl with lid. Dip legs into milk and egg mixture, then drop into bowl with dry ingredients. Cover bowl and shake. Drop legs in hot oil and cook until golden brown.

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Friday, June 24, 2011

Flooding temporarily closes Lewis and Clark State Park

JEFFERSON CITY, MO, JUNE 24, 2011 – Lewis and Clark State Park near Rushville in Buchanan County has been closed temporarily because of flooding from rising water levels from the Missouri RiverMissouri State Park officials closed the park today and will continue to evaluate the situation to determine when the park can reopen.
             “We have been watching the water levels and monitoring forecasts to determine if and when water will affect Lewis and Clark State Park,” said Bill Bryan, Missouri State Parks director, a division of the Department of Natural Resources.  "Because of rising water levels in Lewis and Clark Lake, we decided to close the park immediately."   
Although the park had been open for use, staff has been preparing for possible flooding such as removing equipment and other items. Campers have been relocated toWeston Bend State Park and campers with reservations had already been notified that flooding was likely. Because of its location on an oxbow lake near the Missouri River, Lewis and Clark State Park has experienced flooding in the past and has plans in place for how to deal with flooding situations. Staff will continue to monitor the situation and reopen the park when it is safe for visitors to return.
Although Lewis and Clark State Park is temporarily closed, there are other state parks in northwest Missouri that are open for campers and other visitors. These includeWallace State Park near Cameron, Weston Bend State Park near Weston and WatkinsMill State Park and State Historic Site near Lawson. For information about these state parks, visit mostateparks.com.
To check the status of Lewis and Clark State Park or for more information aboutMissouri state parks, go to mostateparks.com or call the Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (TDD).   

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Lake of the Ozarks sampling of 12 coves finds no elevated E. Coli levels

JEFFERSON CITY, MO, JUNE 22, 2011 – The sampling of 12 Upper Lake of the Ozark coves Monday found none with E. coli levels in excess of the federal standard for public swimming beaches, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources announced today.

In the final year of a five-year program, the department is sampling water from coves in the Upper Lake of the Ozarks from the Brown Bend area (Mile Marker 61) to the U.S. Highway 65 bridge (Mile Marker 90). The purpose of the program is to develop a five-year baseline that will assist in future studies of the lake’s health.
 All of the coves sampled Monday will be tested monthly through October, including immediately following the Independence Day and Labor Day weekends.

The state water quality standard for swimming and related whole body contact recreation is a geometric mean of 126 E. coli colonies per 100 milliliters of water during the entire recreational season. A geometric mean is a statistical method used to analyze data collected over a period of time.
Because the state standard requires data collected over the entire summer before a determination is made, the department reports monthly results as compared to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s single-sample standard of 235 E. coli colonies per 100 milliliters of water for swimming beaches.

E. coli is a bacteria found in the intestinal tract of warm-blooded animals, including humans.  While most strains of E. coli are harmless, some can cause gastrointestinal illness.  The testing process used in this study does not differentiate between strains.

These bacteria and other pathogens can reach lake water from many different sources, both human and animal.  For some people, such as children, elderly or those with weakened immune systems, even low levels of these bacteria may cause illness.


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Trying to Decide on Career or Looking for a New One: How About Training to be a MDC Agent?

Regional Director Visiting with Missouri Depar...Image by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Midwest Region via Flickr
MDC Taking Applications for Agent Trainees
Some consider it the best job in the world. It’s also one of the most demanding. If you think you have what it takes to be a conservation agent, now is the time to try.

JEFFERSON CITY MO -- The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is accepting applications for the next class of conservation agent trainees. MDC’s Protection Division will select a handful of candidates from hundreds of applicants. These select candidates will then undergo 26 weeks of intense training in all facets of law enforcement and resource management. Those who make the grade will receive county assignments and become the face of conservation in their assigned communities – enforcing the Wildlife Code of Missouri and helping the public with such issues as nuisance wildlife and land management.

To qualify, applicants must have a bachelor’s degree in a field related to the natural sciences or criminal justice. The application deadline is July 22.

For more information, including salary range, duties and responsibilities, qualifications, core competencies and special-ability requirements, and to apply, visit the Career Openings section at www.MissouriConservation.org. Contact MDC Protection Programs Supervisor Cheryl Fey at 573-751-4115, ext. 3819, or Cheryl.Fey@mdc.mo.gov with questions.

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Thursday, June 23, 2011

To Hire a Guide or Outfitter...Or Not

Pomme de Terre LakeImage via WikipediaThe decision as to whether or not to hire a guide or outfitter involves a number of different variables.  The issues involved are not as simple as whether or not the finances are viable. Though this consideration may be a necessary condition to be able to hire someone, it is not sufficient in and of itself.  No, there are a number of other things you should think about.  We will cover some of these considerations, and then provide you with a nice resource for finding guides and outfitters here in Missouri.

Many of the considerations that you'll take into account will be the same whether it be for hunting or fishing.  However, some of the factors will be unique.  Let's start off by looking at the factors common to both.


  • Will Hiring a Guide Pay Long Term Dividends as Well as Increase You Chances of Success on  a Particular Trip?
Hiring a fishing or hunting guide has the potential to pay long term dividends.  Naturally, if you live in Kansas and are headed to Alaska on a trip, the benefits of hiring a guide for a bear or moose hunt are pretty well confined to that trip.  However, if you are a Missouri resident, and you want to learn how to catch fish on Lake of the Ozarks, Mark Twain, or Taneycomo, the first trip out it might be a wise move to get a guide.

Likewise, if you are just getting started hunting for deer, and you want to flatten out your learning curve, hiring a guide might be a good move.  One unique aspect with a hunting guide is the issue of whether or not the type of hunting you will be able to do alone will be the same as where the guide takes you.  He will likely have private ground, and if you will be hunting public ground when you go, the knowledge he can provide might only be minimally helpful.. It's just so different hunting public vs. private land.


  • Are There Guides or Outfitters Available Where You Want to Go?
It might seem that there would be guides services or outfitters in just about every Missouri that is a popular outdoor destination.  As we set up our Guides and Outfitters Directory, we were kind of surprised that there were so many areas with few if any advertised guides.  This is definitely true of the fishing guides.  Essentially, as you might expect, they are concentrated at the major lakes throughout the state like Lake of the Ozarks, Table Rock, Truman, Taneycomo, etc.  If you start looking at smaller (or at least less popular) lakes like Pomme De Terre, there might be one or none serving the area.

Related to this, some of the lakes are close enough where a guide will offer services on two or three area lakes.  You can usually tell which of these is his primary area, and we suggest you hire a guide where this is the case.

One other cautionary note: Many areas have restrictions on guiding (hunting and/or fishing).  There may be licensing requirements, etc.  You do not want to go out with a guide who is flying by the seat of his pants like this.  If he is willing to cut corners here, you can bet that he's willing to cut corners on safety and other important matters.

Let's look at one consideration that is sort of unique to hunting, but at least in a couple of circumastances I know of could play a part in fishing.


  • Will Hiring a Guide Have the Added Benefit of Getting You on Land (or perhaps a Private Stream) You Might Have to Pay a Trespass Fee For Otherwise?
If you will hunt private land, even if you do not hire a guide, and you do not own land, there will be a cost associated.  This cost might be a lease or some other form of payment.  When considering the cost of a guide, the right way to do a comparison, is to subtract off from his fee what you'd pay for getting on some land.  The other benefit is that you should be able to count on the land the guide brings you to as being pretty productive.

There are certainly some other things to think about, and most definitely some criteria you must think over in the process of hiring a guide or outfitter.  Many of these criteria are outlined in the Missouri Guide and Outfitters Directory.  This directory lists a large number of guides and outfitters for many regions of Missouri from the Ozarks to all four corners of the state.

If you are a guide or outfitter we missed in the directory, use the contact us link and let us know what you do.  


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AMERICA’S GREAT OUTDOORS

Seal of the United States Department of the In...Image via Wikipedia
WASHINGTON, D.C. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar today announced a
draft vision plan to guide the growth and management of the National
Wildlife Refuge System.  The draft document, developed by the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Refuge Association, articulates
a 10-year vision for the Refuge System.

The vision document, entitled Conserving the Future: Wildlife Refuges and
the Next Generation, offers nearly 100 draft recommendations to protect
and improve the world's premier system of public lands and water set aside
to conserve America's fish, wildlife and plants for the continuing benefit
of the American people.  Starting today, the draft document will be
available for public comment until Earth Day, April 22, 2011.

The Conserving the Future process comes on the heels of President Obama's
America's Great Outdoors initiative to develop a conservation and outdoor
recreation agenda for the 21st century.  The process to develop a new
vision for the Refuge System goes hand-in-hand with many of the priorities
identified through the America's Great Outdoors national dialogue,
including greater access to recreation and connecting a new generation of
conservationists to the outdoors.

"The National Wildlife Refuge System is one of the crown jewels of our
conservation efforts and we must ensure that the System has the tools and
vision to meet the challenges of tomorrow," Salazar said. "I encourage all
Americans to participate in the Conserving the Future process and to voice
their bold ideas about the future priorities and management of our
national wildlife refuges."

There are 553 national wildlife refuges with at least one in every state
and U.S. territory. Spanning more than 150 million acres of land and
water, the Refuge System conserves wildlife habitat for hundreds of animal
and plant species and includes more than 20 million acres of designated
wilderness.  The last time a vision statement was articulated for the
System was 1999.

Among the draft vision's recommendations are:

       To engage youth in an array of work and volunteer programs;
       To review the Appropriate Use Policy, so a wider variety of
nature-based experiences may be possible;
       Within the next 10 years, to increase the number of minorities and
people with disabilities who work for the Refuge System, in part by
reaching high school and college youth from diverse communities and
exposing them to Service conservation careers.
       To develop a five-year plan to "green" the Refuge System;
       To encourage a "Friends" group for every staffed refuge; there are
now about 230 Friends groups;
       To develop standards for credibility, efficiency and consistent
application of science in planning and management;
       Working with state fish and wildlife agencies, to prepare a
strategy to double youth participation in hunting and fishing by 2020,
paying special attention to individuals of all ages with disabilities.

A website, http://americaswildlife.org, has been created to gather
comments and ideas.  A refined vision document reflecting the comments and
ideas received online is expected to be published in July 2011.

The use of new technologies and social media for this process invites the
American people to contribute their bold ideas to set a new direction for
the Refuge System, said Rowan Gould, Acting Director of the Fish and
Wildlife Service. The time to engage is now. Join the conversation online
through the website.

For more information on Conserving the Future: Wildlife Refuges and the
Next Generation, please visit the website at http://americaswildlife.org.
Learn more about the National Wildlife Refuge System at
http://www.fws.gov/refuges.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others
to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats
for the continuing benefit of the American people.  We are both a leader
and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our
scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources,
dedicated professionals and commitment to public service.  For more
information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit
www.fws.gov.

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MDC Fishing Report 6/23/2011

Largemouth Bass - Micropterus salmoidesImage via WikipediaPLEASE CHECK REGULATIONS CAREFULLY: Special regulations may apply to designated portions of water bodies; some baits and lures may not be legal for all portions.


CENTRAL REGION (573) 882-8388

    LAKES

Binder: 79 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass fair on topwater lures and plastic Gulps; bluegill good on crickets and worms; channel catfish good on stinkbaits and nightcrawlers; all other species slow.




 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Blind Pony Lake: 75 degrees, low, dingy; largemouth bass good on plastic worms and topwater lures; sunfish fair on nightcrawlers; all other species slow; the lake is closed to private boats, and bait held or transported in containers with water is prohibited. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Bagnell Tailwater): 67 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass slow, try worms and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on cut baits, stinkbaits, chicken livers and worms.
 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Glaize): 83 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on worms, cut baits, and stinkbaits.
 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Gravois): 83 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on worms, cut baits and stinkbaits.



 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Niangua): 83 degrees, muddy; crappie slow, try minnows and jigs; white bass slow, try spinners; black bass slow, try plastic worms; catfish fair on cut shad and live bait.
 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Osage): 83 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored 
soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on worms, cut baits and stinkbaits.
 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Little Dixie: 73 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on plastic worms and topwater lures; bluegill good on crickets and worms; channel catfish good on cut bait and nightcrawlers; crappie fair on minnows; all other species slow.  Area closed to all activity between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

    RIVERS

Lamine: high, muddy; flathead catfish and channel catfish fair on setlines baited with live bluegill and small creek chubs upstream; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Missouri (Middle): high, muddy; flathead catfish fair in tributaries on live bait; blue and channel catfish fair on live bait and cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Osage (lower, at Tuscumbia): 68 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass slow, try worms and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and crappie jigs; crappie slow, try minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good on cut baits, stinkbaits, chicken livers and worms.
 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

----------------------
KANSAS CITY REGION (816) 655-6254

    LAKES

James A. Reed Area: 82 degrees, clear; full pool; largemouth bass good; channel catfish, crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish fair; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Montrose: 74 degrees, normal, dingy; catfish and black bass fair; all other species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Schell-Osage (Atkinson Lake): 80 degrees, clear; catfish good; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Schell-Osage (Schell Lake): 83 degrees, clear; catfish good; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Truman: 81 degrees, high, clear; crappie good on main lake points using jigs and minnows; black bass fair on main lake points using crankbaits and plastic worms; catfish fair using cut bait or shad; white bass and hybrid bass fair using spoons. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Truman Tailwaters: 81 degrees, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

    RIVERS

Missouri River: high, the river is flooded; all species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

----------------------
NORTHEAST REGION (660) 785-2420

    LAKES

Hunnewell: 82 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits; channel catfish good on chicken liver and stinkbaits; bluegill fair on crickets and red wigglers; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Long Branch: 75 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish and blue catfish good on rod and reel along rip-rap off Hwy AX using stinkbaits and leeches; channel catfish and blue catfish good on setlines using live baits and cut bait; flathead catfish fair on setlines using live baits and cut bait; crappie good using jigs and minnows near rocks, coves with flooded timber and trolling near dam; carp piping in the coves; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Mark Twain: 71 degrees, high, dingy; lake temperature taken at the dam; crappie fair on jigs and minnows; channel catfish fair on live sunfish; largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; white bass good on small crankbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Sever: 78 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on stinkbait and liver; bluegill good on crickets; black bass fair on jig and pig; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Thomas Hill: 82 degrees, high, dingy; water temperature 90 degrees at warm water boat dock; channel catfish good on Stinking Creek arm off Hwy T with shad sides; largemouth bass 
fair using lures; all other species slow.  (Report made on 6/23/2011)

    RIVERS

Mississippi (above St. Louis): 74 degrees, high, muddy; above flood stage; access difficult due to flooding; drum fair on nightcrawlers; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers; sturgeon fair on nightcrawlers; flathead catfish fair on live baits; blue catfish fair on cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Salt (below Mark Twain): 74 degrees, rising, muddy; water levels are fluctuating day to day; all species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

----------------------
NORTHWEST REGION (816) 271-3100

    LAKES

Bilby Ranch Lake: 75 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish good on cut bait; black bass good on topwater lures; bluegill, walleye and crappie fair. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Mozingo: 80 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass fair; crappie fair on jigs over brush; bluegill fair on worms in shallow water; channel catfish good on cut bait; walleye good on crankbaits. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Paho: 72 degrees, normal, clear; an abundance of submerged vegetation has produced good trophy largemouth bass fishing with artificial plastic baits in shallows in low light conditions
; channel catfish are being taken on stinkbaits fished at the edge of the flooded grasses and willows; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Pony Express: 72 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish good using stinkbait and chicken livers; largemouth bass good on topwater baits; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Smithville: 76 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie fair; spawn mostly over and are moving to deeper water and cover, biting on minnows and jigs in deeper tree cover near bay entrances; largemouth bass fair in shallow water on a wide variety of lures including spinnerbaits, stickbaits and jigs; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers, shad and prepared baits; white bass slow; walleye fair on jigs, worms or rattle baits on flat lake points. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

    RIVERS

Grand: 72 degrees, falling, dingy; channel catfish and blue catfish fair; flathead catfish slow; all other species fair. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Missouri (below Iowa line): 70 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow; all recreational boating has been restricted by the U.S. Coast Guard from Iowa line to St. Joseph. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

----------------------
OZARK REGION (417) 255-9561

    LAKES

Bull Shoals (East): 84 degrees, high, dingy; smallmouth bass fair on soft plastics; catfish fair on limb lines and trotlines. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Norfork: 84 degrees, high, dingy; smallmouth bass fair on soft plastics; catfish fair on limb lines and trotlines. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

    RIVERS

Big Piney (lower, Pulaski Co.): 75 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-
eye fair on jigs and soft plastic baits.  (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Big Piney (Upper): 71 degrees, low, clear; black bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastics; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Bryant Creek: 73 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastics; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Current: 74 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass good on suspended rigs with soft plastic baits; all other species good on live baits and plastics. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Eleven Point: 60 degrees, normal, clear; rainbow trout good on corn and prepared baits; all other species good on natural baits. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Gasconade (middle, Pulaski Co.): 75 degrees, normal, dingy; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye fair on soft plastic baits and jigs. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Gasconade (upper): 80 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass, sunfish, and goggle-eye fair on nightcrawlers and soft plastic baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Jacks Fork: 78 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass good on spinnerbaits; goggle-eye good on soft plastics. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

North Fork: 68 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on soft plastic baits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

----------------------
SOUTHEAST REGION (573) 290-5858

    LAKES

Clearwater Lake: 81 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Council Bluff: 81 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on dark colored soft plastics; channel catfish fair on liver; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Cypress Lake: 80 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish good in 2'-3' depths using crickets, worms, and stinkbait; crappie fair in 3' depths using minnows and jigs; bluegill and redear sunfish good in 1'-3' depths using crickets, small jigs, and small pieces of worms; 
largemouth bass fair in 2'-3' depths on spinnerbaits and jigs;  all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Duck Creek: high, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Lake Girardeau: 72 degrees, high, dingy; all species fair. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Perry County Lake: 82 degrees, normal, clear; black bass fair on plastic worms; sunfish good on crickets; channel catfish good on worms. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Robert DeLaney Lake: 80 degrees, normal, dingy; bluegill and warmouth fair on crickets and waxworms close to the bank; channel, blue and flathead catfish fair on worms, live sunfish and stinkbait; crappie slow on jigs and minnows; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Wappapello: high, black bass fair early and late on spinnerbaits and plastic worms; crappie good on minnows and jigs; bluegill fair on crickets and worms; crappie good on minnows and jigs; channel catfish fair on trotlines using live bait. Call the Wappapello Lake Recreation Hotline for updates at 573-222-8139. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

    RIVERS

Black River (near Annapolis): 74 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye slow on plastic baits. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Castor River (above Zalma): normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on minnows; all other species good.   (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Lower Black River (Clearwater Dam): high, muddy; channel catfish fair on live bait; black bass fair in backwater areas on minnows and jigs; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Mississippi (below Charleston): rising, muddy; blue and channel catfish good on worms in the river and backwater chutes; crayfish good in backwater ditches and floodplains; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Mississippi River (Cape Girardeau): high, muddy; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers 
and chicken livers; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

St. Francis (above Wappapello): normal, dingy; channel catfish good on large minnows and nightcrawlers; black bass good on topwater lures early morning and late evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

St. Francis (below Wappapello): 72 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish good on stinkbaits, worms and chicken liver; flathead catfish good on live bait; bluegill fair on waxworms and red wigglers; crappie fair on minnows and jigs; black bass slow. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

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SOUTHWEST REGION (417) 895-6881

    LAKES

Bull Shoals (West): 78-81 degrees, high, clear; Dam/Swan Creek area: black bass good on jigs, soft plastics, and nightcrawlers; white bass fair on swimming minnows; walleye fair on jerkbaits; Beaver Creek area: black bass good on jigs, soft plastics and nightcrawlers; walleye fair on nightcrawlers and jerkbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Lake Taneycomo: 50 degrees, normal, clear; trout good on flies and black, white, and olive colored marabou jigs or fluorescent orange, chartreuse, and bubblegum colored Power Baits, nightcrawlers and corn. (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Pomme de Terre: 85 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on plastic baits around submerged structure and points; crappie good on minnows and jigs around structure in 15' of water; catfish good on live bait using trotlines. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Stockton: 78 degrees, high, clear; catfish good on liver and nightcrawlers; crappie good on minnows and tube jigs in 10' to 15' of water near brush piles; walleye good on jigs and minnows while jigging on bottom off main points and brush piles; black bass good on jigs and Critter Craws on points in the evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Table Rock (James River arm): 83 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms in 10' to 15' of water around bridge piers and standing timber in clean water; black bass fair while dragging 1 oz. jigs with a purple/green trailer on points in 6' to 10' of water, also try crankbaits that dive 6' to 14' deep; catfish fair on nightcrawlers,
 stinkbaits, and cut baits on pole and line or on live bait on limb lines and trotlines; white bass fair on topwater lures or shallow diving lures in bright colors, best time is in the evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Table Rock (main lake): 83 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill good on live crickets, nightcrawlers or mealworms in 10' to 15' of water around bridge piers and standing timber in clean water; black bass fair while dragging 1 oz. jigs with a purple/green trailer on points in 6' to 10' of water, also try crankbaits that dive 6' to 14' deep; catfish fair on nightcrawlers, stinkbaits, and cut baits on pole and line or on live bait on limb lines and trotlines; white bass fair on topwater lures or shallow diving lures in bright colors, best time is in the evening; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

    RIVERS

Big Niangua: 66 degrees, high, dingy; trout fair, best on natural baits and Power Baits below Bennett Spring; black bass slow, best on soft plastics; goggle-eye slow, best on soft plastics and jigs; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/21/2011)

James River (lower): 85 degrees, normal, clear; goggle-eye good on minnows and spinners and on Road Runners in the streams; black bass fair on nightcrawlers and crankbaits off the points; catfish fair on cut baits and nightcrawlers using trotlines and limb lines; crappie fair on jigs and minnows. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

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ST. LOUIS REGION (636) 300-1953

    LAKES

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lake 33: 80 degrees, normal, dingy; bluegill fair on natural baits; black bass good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; please remove your litter. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lakes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 23: 80 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on blood baits; limit 4; bluegill fair on natural baits; black bass 
good on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; please remove litter.


 (Report made on 6/23/2011)

    RIVERS

Big River: 78 degrees, rising, muddy; channel catfish good on worms; black bass fair on worms; crappie slow on minnows; bluegill fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Bourbeuse (middle, lower, Franklin Co.): 75 degrees, falling, dingy; channel catfish slow on cut bait, worms and blood bait; black bass slow on spinnerbaits and plastic worms; bluegill fair on worms; all other species slow on worms.
 (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Meramec (above Sullivan, Crawford Co.): 78 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish fair on blood bait, bluegill and doughbait; black bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms; crappie slow on jigs; bluegill fair on worms; all other species slow.  (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Meramec (below Eureka): 72 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish fair on blood bait, bluegill and doughbait; black bass fair on spinnerbaits and plastic worms; crappie slow on jigs; bluegill fair on worms; all other species slow.  (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Missouri (below New Haven): 72 degrees, high, muddy;  channel catfish  fair on worms and prepared bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 6/23/2011)

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TROUT PARKS

Bennett Spring State Park: 54 degrees, the spring level is near normal; Zone 1 and 2 best lures: John Deere colored mini jigs, ginger colored and brown colored bead head Cracklebacks, gingersnap with 8 oz. gold head colored,  red and black colored, pink and white colored and salmon and brown colored  marabou jigs, green and black with a gold spinner and black colored with a silver spinner Rooster Tails, shrimp colored, chartreuse colored and red and white colored glo balls, red colored and olive colored brassies; Zone 3 best lures: white with glitter colored and yellow with glitter colored Power Baits, white colored Trout Nip and salmon eggs.   Fishing hours for June are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Due to heavy weed cover we will 
finish cutting weeds Tuesday, June 28, and possibly Wednesday, June 29.  Sorry for any inconvenience.   (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Maramec Spring Park: 56 degrees, normal, clear; fishing is good; the water is slowly falling and clearing up; dough and putty baits are producing good numbers; fish free floating or underneath a float; feather jigs in black/yellow, olive, white, and pink are producing good numbers of fish; fishing hours for the month of June are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.  (Report made on 6/23/2011)

Montauk State Park: 58 degrees, normal, clear; the river level is normal; the water is clear;  fishing is good on most baits; dough and putty baits are working well, as are flies and jigs; the best fishing is during the morning and evening hours. June fishing hours are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.


For up-to-date stream conditions check  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440 (Report made on 6/22/2011)

Roaring River State Park: 58 degrees, the river is clear and running normal; fishing has been very good; plastic worms and power eggs are working very well; use scented baits in zones allowed; spinners are good; Rooster Tail-type spinners in black, brown, olive and bright orange have all been good; nightcrawlers and minnows are good in Zone 3.

 (Report made on 6/22/2011)
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