Monday, July 30, 2012

Free Onondaga Cave tickets offered for locating bats

Onondaga Cave 10_09 Picture 46
Onondaga Cave  (Photo credit: jeffmgrandy)
You can win a Missouri State Parks prize package by watching for bats flying down our nation’s highways on the sides of U-Haul trucks.

This summer, U-Haul’s newest SuperGraphic features Onondaga Cave State Park near Leasburg and the red bat that makes its home in the woods of the park. The SuperGraphic is part of U-Haul’s “Venture Across America” campaign for its 1,900 new moving vans that travel all over the United States.  

As a part of its campaign, observant viewers can win a Missouri State Parks/U-Haul prize package by spotting these special U-Haul vans. When you spot a van with the special Onondaga Cave SuperGraphic, take a photo of it, upload it and indicate where you saw it. You will be automatically entered to win a prize package that includes four tickets to tour Onondaga Cave in Onondaga Cave State Park. Go to facebook.com/mostateparks for more information and to upload your photo. Entries will be received through Aug. 31, 2012; one entry per person please.

Onondaga Cave is one of the state’s most outstanding caves and is a designated National Natural Landmark because of the number and quality of its cave formations. The cave is the main feature of Onondaga Cave State Park, which also includes a visitor center with displays about caves, a campground, trails, picnic sites and access to the Meramec River for fishing and canoeing. The park is located on Highway H off Interstate 44 at the Leasburg (#214) exit in Crawford County. 

Saturday, July 28, 2012

Missouri State Parks hosts bison hike Aug. 4 at Prairie State Park

American Bison (Bison bison). Image taken at W...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Experience seeing one of our most magnificent mammals on its native prairie habitat during a bison hike Aug. 4 at Prairie State Park near Mindenmines. Sponsored by Missouri State Parks, this free hike will begin at 10 a.m. at the visitor center.

During the hike, participants will learn about bison biology, Native American uses, herd dynamics, prairies and much more. The hike could last at least one hour and possibly longer depending on the location of the bison herd.

Prairie State Park is located at 128 NW 150th Lane, Mindenmines, in Barton County. To register or to get additional information about the event, contact the park at 417-843-6711. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

MDC offers free workshops on managing private land for deer

Missouri is a great place to hunt deer and private landowners are key.

Courtesy MDC
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is offering free workshops in August and September to help landowners, hunters and others manage private land for deer. Workshop topics will include: creating or improving habitat for deer and other wildlife; developing a deer-management plan; estimating deer numbers, ages and how many deer land can support; using camera surveys and other data; deer biology, antler growth and breeding behavior; MDC cost-share opportunities, and more.

“Missouri is a great place to hunt deer and private landowners are the key,” says MDC Resource Scientist and Deer Biologist Emily Flinn. “More than 90 percent of land in Missouri is privately owned, so we work with and for private landowners to help them create and manage their land for deer. Managing private land for deer also benefits a variety of other wildlife.”

Flinn adds that deer hunting contributes approximately $1.1 billion annually to the state and local economies and supports more than 12,000 jobs in Missouri.

She urges landowners, hunters and others to attend one of the following free deer management workshops:

SPRINGFIELD -- Aug. 11, 8 a.m. - noon
MDC Springfield Conservation Nature Center, 4601 S. Nature Center Way
To register, call 417-895-6880.

COLUMBIA -- Aug. 18, 8 a.m. - noon
University of Missouri Bradford Research & Extension Center, 4968 Rangeline Road
To register, call 573-875-5540 ext. 3.

ST. JOSEPH -- Sept. 8, noon - 4 p.m.
Missouri Western State University Kemper Recital Hall in Spratt Hall, 4525 Downs Drive
To register, call 816-271-3100.

ST. LOUIS -- Sept. 22, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. (lunch provided)
MDC Powder Valley Nature Center, 11715 Cragwold Road in Kirkwood.
To register, call 636-528-4877 x3.

CAPE GIRARDEAU -- Sept. 12, 6 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
MDC Cape Girardeau Conservation Nature Center, 2289 County Park Drive
To register, call 573-290-5218.

For more information on managing private land for deer and other wildlife, visit mdc.mo.gov and search “deer management” or contact a local MDC office.

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

MDC to host blue catfish-management open houses

English: Artist's rendering of a Blue catfish ...
 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Come to learn what MDC has in mind and express your opinion.

CAMDENTON–Anglers can bring questions and advice about blue-catfish regulations to open houses sponsored by the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) next month.

The open houses will deal with possible regulation changes at Truman Reservoir and Lake of the Ozarks. Open-house dates are:

· Aug. 21 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Mid-County Fire Protection District meeting room, 184 N. Business Rt. 5, Camdenton

· Aug. 23 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the First Baptist Church Gymnasium, 209 E. Jefferson St., Clinton

· Aug. 25 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Warsaw Lincoln EMS Station, 1206 Medic Drive, Warsaw

Participants can come and go at any time with the open-house format. They can ask questions of MDC staff and express their ideas about the potential changes at the events or take comment cards and send them in later. Those who cannot attend the open houses can express their preferences at mdc.mo.gov/node/18097.

Since the early 1990s, anglers and MDC biologists have expressed concerns about the declining number of larger blue catfish being caught from Truman Reservoir. In a survey, more than a third of Truman Reservoir anglers said they thought the quality of catfishing had declined. A study at Truman Reservoir from 2004 to 2009 confirmed anglers’ concerns by showing that blue catfish 24 inches and larger were being harvested at an extremely high rate. Similar concerns have emerged more recently at Lake of the Ozarks.

Blue catfish frequently grow to 60 pounds and can exceed 100 pounds. Both Truman Reservoir and Lake of the Ozarks contain adequate to excessive numbers of smaller blue catfish. However, heavy harvest of blue catfish 24 inches and larger is not allowing them to reach the larger sizes desired by many anglers.

In response to these facts and anglers concerns, MDC developed potential regulation changes to address the problem. It presented those ideas during at stakeholder meetings in Camdenton, Clinton and Warsaw in 2010. Most public comments at that time favored implementing the potential changes. MDC modified the original proposal in response to concerns expressed by stakeholders.

Regulation changes now under consideration include:

· Increasing the daily limit from five to 10 blue catfish. This would allow anglers to take home more fish.

· Adding a protected slot-length limit for medium-size blue catfish of 24 to 32 inches (5 to 13 pounds), 25 to 33 inches (6 to 15 pounds) or 26 to 34 inches (7 to 16 pounds). This would allow medium-size blue catfish to reach larger sizes.

· Allowing the harvest of one or two blue catfish above the protected slot-length limit. This would enable anglers to harvest or catch and release larger fish.

The changes would affect blue catfish at the two lakes and their tributaries, including the no-boating zone below Truman Dam.

Open houses are one way MDC works with citizens to keep Missouri a great place to hunt and fish.

-Jim Low-

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Missouri State Parks hosts Explorer Camp July 28 at Prairie State Park

Rock Bridge Memorial State Park in Missouri
Rock Bridge Memorial State Park in Missouri (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Become a Missouri State Park Explorer and earn a special patch at the Explorer Camp July 28 at Prairie State Park near Mindenmines. Sponsored by Missouri State Parks, this year’s camp is titled Nature at Night and is open to the public.

The six-hour camp runs from 4 until 10 p.m. and will feature activities to help you learn about what happens on the prairie after dark. Once you complete the camp, you will meet all the requirements needed to earn the Missouri State Park Explorer Patch.

The Explorer Camp is free but registration is required by July 21. To register and get additional information about this camp, contact Prairie State Park at 417-843-6711.

Prairie State Park is located at 128 NW 150th Lane, Mindenmines in Barton County. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Monday, July 23, 2012

Missouri State Parks offers two new volunteer programs

Grand Gulf State Park in Missouri. The stream ...
Grand Gulf State Park in Missouri. The stream flowing into this cave at the bottom of Grand Gulf, a huge Ponor, resurfaces at Mammoth Spring, Arkansas. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Groups and youth now have new ways to volunteer in Missouri state parks. The Adopt-a-Park and Youth Volunteer Patch programs have recently been added to the ways people can volunteer to improve Missouri state parks and historic sites.

The Missouri State Parks Adopt-a-Park Program gives families, organizations, youth groups, school groups and businesses the opportunity to support a Missouri state park or historic site. Areas within a park or historic site, such as trails, campgrounds, picnic areas and streams, can be adopted. Groups are asked to contribute 200 hours of service hours a year for two years. After completion of 100 hours, a sign will be put up at the park or historic site recognizing the group’s efforts. A list of adoptable areas at each facility is available online at mostateparks.com/page/59523/adopt-park-program. Check out the adoptable areas, and then contact the individual park or historic site to get started!

The Youth Volunteer Patch Program gives individuals under the age of 18 and organized youth groups, such as Scouts, 4-H groups and Future Farmers of America, the opportunity to assist with a variety of projects in a state park or historic site to earn patches. Lists of potential projects at each facility are available online at mostateparks.com/page/59696/youth-volunteer-patch-program. Groups or individuals should contact the park or historic site to arrange a day of service. Upon completion, each individual will receive a Missouri State Parks Youth Volunteer patch.

For more information about each program, go to the web pages listed above. For more information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources

Sunday, July 22, 2012

Waterfowl forecast brilliant, teal season 16 days

English: Green-winged Teal Male (Anas crecca)
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Breeding numbers are at record levels for several species.

Written by Jim Low, MDC

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo – The results of this year’s North American Duck Breeding Population Survey are in, and the news is excellent, beginning with news that Missouri will have a 16-day early teal season.

The U.S. and Canadian fish and wildlife services have conducted aerial surveys to estimate breeding-duck numbers since 1955. The survey also evaluates nesting habitat conditions. The annual report of this survey provides an early look at prospects for the coming hunting season. This year’s report estimates total duck numbers at 48.6 million continent-wide. That is a 7-percent increase from last year and up 43 percent from the long-term average (LTA).

The North American population of mallards, the mainstay species for Missouri waterfowl hunters, is estimated at 10.6 million this year. That is up 15 percent from 2011 and 40 percent above the LTA. Mallard numbers have exceeded this year’s figure only twice in the past 56 years - 1958 and 1999.

The length of Missouri’s early teal hunting season is set according to the number of blue-winged teal recorded in the annual survey. Blue-winged teal numbers this year are estimated at 9.2 million. That is similar to last year’s population. It also is 94 percent above the LTA and nearly twice the 4.7 million needed for the maximum early-season length of 16 days under federal guidelines. This year’s early teal season will open Sept. 8 and run through Sept. 23.

Other duck species breeding populations recorded in the 2012 survey include:
o   Gadwall, 3.6 million, similar to last year and 96 percent above LTA.
o   Pintail, 3.5 million, 22 percent below 2011 and 14 percent below LTA.
o   Green-winged teal, 3.5 million, up 20 percent from 2011 and 74 percent above LTA.
o   Wigeon, 2.1 million, similar to 2011 and 17 percent below LTA.
o   Scaup, 5.2 million, up 21 percent from last year and similar to LTA
o   Shoveler, 5 million, similar to 2011 and 111 percent above LTA.
o   Redhead, 1.3 million, similar to 2011 and 89 percent above LTA.
o   Canvasback, 800,000, similar to 2011 and 33 percent above LTA.

Doreen Mengel, a resource scientist with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), notes that habitat conditions in the north-central United States and central Canada, where most of Missouri’s ducks are produced, were not as good this year as in 2011. She says that could cut into nesting success. However, she also noted that above-average precipitation that occurred in prairie Canada after the survey was completed may have improved conditions for late-nesting species, any re-nesting attempts and for brood-rearing.

“It would have been difficult to imagine that we would see these kinds of waterfowl numbers 20 years ago,” says Mengel. “Having near-record duck populations is a testament to the hard work hunters and conservation groups have made to restore wetland habitat on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border. It’s reason for celebration. However, remember that weather, local habitat conditions, and migration timing will play major roles in shaping the 2012 teal and regular waterfowl seasons we experience in Missouri.”

The Missouri Conservation Commission will set opening and closing dates, bag limits and other details of the regular waterfowl season at its August meeting.

Friday, July 20, 2012

Missouri State Parks hosts informational meeting July 21 at Crowder State Park

English: Missouri state parks and historical d...
Missouri state parks and historical districts (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The public is invited to bring their ideas to an informational meeting Saturday, July 21 at Crowder State Park near Trenton. Sponsored by Missouri State Parks, the meeting will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. in the campground amphitheater.

Recent accomplishments at the park and future plans will be highlighted during the informational meeting. During the meeting, the future operation of the beach area will be discussed. Visitors are invited to share comments on Crowder State Park’s services and operations.

This informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort by Missouri State Parks to ensure citizens have input on facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.

Crowder State Park is located west of Trenton off Highway 6. People requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling the park directly at 660-359-647. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Thursday, July 19, 2012

Missouri State Parks hosts bison hike at Prairie State Park on July 21

American Bison (Bison bison). Image taken at W...
 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Experience seeing one of our most magnificent mammals on its native prairie habitat during a bison hike July 21 at Prairie State Park near Mindenmines. Sponsored by Missouri State Parks, this free hike will begin at 10 a.m. at the visitor center.

During the hike, participants will learn about bison biology, Native American uses, herd dynamics, prairies and much more. The hike could last at least one hour and possibly longer depending on the location of the bison herd.

Prairie State Park is located at 128 NW 150th Lane, Mindenmines, in Barton County. To register or to get additional information about the event, contact the park at 417-843-6711. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Missouri State Parks swimming beaches offer relief from the heat

English: Lake Lincoln in Cuivre River State Pa...
 Lake Lincoln in Cuivre River State Park in Missouri (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
One of the easiest ways to do something about the heat is to take a cooling, relaxing plunge in the water at one of the 17 Missouri State Parks swimming beaches throughout the state.
As has been the case throughout the summer, weekly water sampling showed that all state parks beaches met water quality standards as set by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, and will be open and welcoming visitors.
The beaches at two parks, Lewis and Clark State Park in Buchanan County and Trail of Tears State Park, Cape Girardeau County, remain closed for maintenance unrelated to water quality. Visit mostateparks.com for additional information.
The department samples the water at all designated beaches in the state park system weekly during the recreational season to determine suitability for swimming. The sample test results indicate a snap shot of the water quality taken at the beaches at a specific time; however, a single sample does not provide an overall sense of the water quality in the lake where the beach is located.
Visitors to Missouri State Parks are able to sign up to receive free electronic notices about the status of state park beaches by visiting the department’s website at http://bit.ly/HlSnaG. In addition, visitors may continue to check the state park beach status on the department’s website at http://bit.ly/MoStateParksBeachStatus as well as mostateparks.com.
Missouri's state parks and historic sites offer something to suit everyone's taste - outdoor adventure, great scenery and a bit of history. With Missouri's 86 state parks and historic sites, the possibilities are boundless. For more information about Missouri State Parks, a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, visit mostateparks.com.

Nature photography is easy on July 21 at Thousand Hills State Park

Aerial view of Thousand Hills State Park
Aerial view of Thousand Hills State Park (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Do you love nature? Have you ever wanted to capture that perfect sunrise, or that colorful flower, only to be confounded by the buttons and knobs on your camera? Learn how easy nature photography can be on Saturday, July 21 at Thousand Hills State Park near Kirksville. Sponsored by Missouri State Parks, the workshop will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. in the park’s enclosed shelter and is open to the public.

Emily Burke, the park’s naturalist and a hobby nature photographer, will lead the class. This course is designed for beginning and amateur photographers, and will discuss what makes the difference between a snapshot and a masterpiece. Bring your digital camera (yes, even a camera phone) to find out what all the bells and whistles do, and where and how to line up the perfect shot. It's easier than you think!

This course is free, but limited spaces are available. Please call Thousand Hills State Park at 660-665-6995 if you have questions, or would like to RSVP. If you couldn't get a spot, don't worry. This program will be offered one more time before the end of the season.  
Thousand Hills State Park is located two miles west of Kirksville on Highway 157. For more information about Missouri state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

MEETING OF THE MISSOURI CONSERVATION COMMISSION

Thursday, July 12, 2012
Stoney Creek Inn and Conference Center
2601 South Providence Road, Columbia
1:30 p.m. – Executive Session (Closed)

Friday, July 13, 2012
Central Regional Office and Conservation Research Center
E. Sydney Stephens Building, 3500 East Gans Road, Columbia
8:30 a.m. – Regular Open Meeting

TENTATIVE AGENDA

(Background documents related to each agenda item are available for public viewing at Conservation Department Headquarters, Jefferson City, for eight calendar days prior to the meeting. Any person who would like to comment to the Commission about a specific agenda item must make a written request to the Director at least four calendar days prior to the meeting. Speakers will be limited to five minutes each and number of speakers may be limited.  Recording the open meeting is permissible, pursuant to any guidelines established by the Commission to minimize disruption to the meeting. Individuals wishing to record the open meeting by audiotape, videotape or other electronic means should notify the Director at least four calendar days prior to the meeting so accommodations for such recording can be made.)

Thursday, July 12, 1:30 p.m.
Executive Session (Vote to go into closed session – reconvene open meeting at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, July 13):
(1)        Call to order and approval of minutes of previous Executive Session(s). (610.021 RSMo.)
(2)        Consideration of supporting documentation for recommendation to suspend or revoke all hunting and fishing privileges of individuals who are juveniles or who are not in compliance with applicable child support laws. Action to be taken in open meeting. (Disclosure protected by law, 610.021(14), 454.440.9, 211.321, RSMo.)
(3)        Consideration of confidential or privileged communications between the Commission and its Internal Auditor regarding work product. (Communications between public governmental body and its auditor, 610.021(17) RSMo.)
(4)        Consideration of recommendation relating to the hiring/firing/disciplining/promoting of personnel. (Hiring, firing, disciplining or promoting, 610.021(3) RSMo.)
(5)        Consideration of negotiated contracts. (Documents related to a negotiated contract, 610.021(12) RSMo.)
(6)        Update on potential real estate transactions/negotiations. (Leasing, purchase or sale of real estate, 610.021(2) RSMo.)
(7)        Consideration of legal actions and attorney-client privileged communications involving the Conservation Commission. (Legal actions, causes of action or litigation, 610.021(1) RSMo.)

Friday, July 13, 8:30 a.m. – Regular Open Meeting:
Approval of minutes of previous meeting.

Report of the Regulations Committee (no action items).
           
Presentations:
8:45 a.m.         Crayfish – Resource Scientist Bob DiStefano and Resource Science Division Chief Mike Kruse.
 


9:00 a.m.         Comments on crayfish from:
                                    - Kelly Smith, Missouri Farm Bureau, Jefferson City.
                                    - Randy Welpman, Missouri Goldfish Hatchery, Stover.
 
9:20 a.m.         Missouri Elk Research – Dr. Josh Millspaugh, University of Missouri-Columbia.
 
BREAK 9:35-9:45 a.m.
 
9:45 a.m.         Ron Pleus, Jefferson City.
                        Purpose:  To comment on Chronic Wasting Disease in Macon County.
 
9:55 a.m.         Dennis Morrissey, Jefferson City.
                        Purpose: To comment on the status of quail in Missouri and habitat restoration efforts.
 
May and June Monthly Financial Summaries; Status of Major CI-IT Projects Funded in FY12 Budget.

Staff Presentation:  
10:30 a.m.       Energy Efficiency Initiative and Sustainable Features of the Central Regional Office and Conservation Research Center – Design & Development Division Chief Jacob Careaga.

Recommendation for approval of personnel reclassifications; Quarterly Report of Personnel Changes approved by the Director.
 
Recommendations for approval to: 1) sell 2 parcels, consisting of approximately 0.34 acre and 0.4 acre, respectively, of the Weldon Spring Conservation Area in St. Charles County to the State of Missouri, acting by and through the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission, and 2) purchase approximately 160 acres in Jefferson County as an addition to the LaBarque Creek Conservation Area.

Recommendations for approval to suspend or revoke 1) one or more hunting, fishing, or trapping privileges of individuals for cause; 2) all hunting and fishing privileges of individuals who are not in compliance with applicable child support laws; and 3) one or more hunting, fishing and trapping privileges of individuals in accordance with the terms of the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact.

Missouri Prairie Foundation – Bill Crawford, Co-founder and Emeritus Board Member.
Purpose:  Presentation of Resolution commemorating MDC’s 75th Anniversary.

Announcement of actions taken in executive session, if any.

Other matters of interest.

Confirmation that the next regular meeting will be held August 23-24, 2012.

Election of Commission officers.

Monday, July 2, 2012

Incident Management Team To Help Manage Mark Twain National Forest Wildfires

Rolla, MO– USDA Forest Service’s Eastern Area Type 2 Incident Management Team has been brought in to assist managing Mark Twain National Forest wildfires.

The incident management team is composed of experienced federal, state, and local fire and emergency response personnel from 20 states in Forest Service’s Eastern Region, which stretches from Missouri north to the Great Lakes states east to Delaware and up to Maine.

Mark Twain National Forest experiences on average 5,000 to 6,000 acres of wildfires annually, mostly in fall and late winter/early spring. This year, however, severe drought has created extreme fire conditions on the forest and across Missouri.

Given current fire conditions, predicted hot and dry weather in the days ahead, and no precipitation in the forecast, additional resources, including the incident management team, were ordered.  The team will assist Mark Twain National Forest, as needed, during this high fire danger period, ensuring that firefighting resources are managed effectively, and timely and accurate information is provided.



Sunday, July 1, 2012

MDC considering striper stocking


Additional feedback from anglers, plus biological data, will
determine the future of the increasingly popular fishery at Bull Shoals Lake.
THEODOSIA–The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is continuing to assess the potential for stocking a limited number of striped bass in Bull Shoals Lake and welcomes additional comments from anglers regarding this striped-bass fishery.
The main portion of Bull Shoals Lake lies in Arkansas, but several of the lake’s arms extend north across the state line into Ozark and Taney counties in Missouri. Missouri anglers have enjoyed the benefits of a one-time stocking of 19,000 striped bass – commonly called stripers – by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC) in 1998. Some of the survivors of that stocking now weigh nearly 70 pounds – record-class fish on either side of the state line. Missouri’s current pole-and-line record for striped bass is a 60-pound, 9-ounce fish caught at Bull Shoals Lake last June.
 “This fishery has received national attention and has gotten very popular with anglers,” says MDC Fisheries Field Operations Chief Brian Canaday. “Any time you consider starting a stocking program, there are a lot of factors to consider, and we try to be sure we cover all those bases first.”
Canaday says factors MDC is considering include cost, likelihood of success, angler preferences, public opinion and lake ecology.
“You might think this decision would be simple,” says Canaday. “Striper fishing is very popular with some anglers. We want to accommodate that demand if possible, but first we need solid biological data coupled with public input to help make the right decisions.”
Throughout the decision-making process, says Canaday, MDC will continue to work with the AGFC to manage border waters like Bull Shoals for the citizens of both states.
MDC and AGFC held several open-house meetings in the past 18 months to gauge angler opinions about striper stocking. MDC plans to seek further angler input and gather more biological information before making a final decision.
Striped bass are native to the eastern United States. They spend their adult lives in the Atlantic Ocean and swim upstream to spawn in rivers along the East Coast. Artificial culture of striped bass began as a means of sustaining the species in waters upstream from dams, which stopped their spawning runs. The species now is widely stocked in reservoirs throughout the United States.
MDC currently manages striper fisheries at Norfork Lake and Lake of the Ozarks. Because stripers do not reproduce naturally in reservoirs like Bull Shoals, periodic stockings are required to sustain these inland fisheries. If MDC does decide to stock stripers at Bull Shoals Lake, it likely would do so every other year, using fingerling fish reared at an MDC hatchery.
Anglers can express their opinions about possible striper stocking by contacting MDC’s West Plains Regional Office, 551 Joe Jones Blvd., West Plains, MO  65775.  You also can comment at mdc.mo.gov/contact-us/contact-form by selecting the “Fish, Fishing & Fisheries” topic.