Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Infant or injured, the right place for wildlife is in the wild

Leave Bambi in the movies and wildlife in the wild. Trying to rescue orphaned or injured wildlife can actually hurt them.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – How would Bambi’s life have turned out if, after his mother’s death, a sympathetic human had taken him in? The ending probably wouldn’t be as happy as you might expect.

Orphaned deer and other animals appear cute, cuddly and in need of rescuing. But in reality, human help is the last thing they need. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) answers many calls about how to help these wildlife during the spring months. In most cases, the best way to help nature is by leaving it where it belongs.

Why “helping” can hurt
The compassionate human reaction is to want to help wildlife. However, abandoned wildlife are typically harmed by human efforts to rescue them. In fact, trying to help these animals generally decreases their chances of survival. Handling or moving these animals causes them a great deal of stress, and raising young animals for later release deprives them of necessary survival skills they should have learned in the wild.

Leaving an animal without human help does not guarantee its death. Wildlife have their own methods of survival. For example, newly born fawns are scentless, which protects them from predators. This allows a doe to leave her fawn to find food and other necessities. In cases like this, wildlife that appear abandoned are actually not orphaned at all.

How to help
“As a general rule, you should leave animals where they are, put them back where you found them or, if necessary, move them a short distance out of harm’s way,” said MDC Wildlife Programs Supervisor Shawn Gruber.

According to Runge Nature Center Manager Kathy Cavender, people often bring injured or baby wildlife, such as birds, rabbits, squirrels and opossums, to nature centers for help. Cavender said the problem is not a lack of compassion but a lack of understanding of natural ecosystems.

“People often are taking young animals out of the wild when they’re perfectly fine where they are. A lot of what we do is try to get them to understand the bigger picture,” she said.

Cavender also noted that some wildlife myths have to be debunked, such as the common idea that the scent left by human touch will keep a baby animal’s parents away if it is returned to the wild.

“A parent animal’s instincts to care for its young are much stronger than any fear of lingering human scent,” Cavender said.

One way people can assist local wildlife is by not introducing non-native predators, such as free-ranging dogs and domestic cats, to the landscape and by keeping pets confined, especially during the spring.

-          -- Rebecca Maples --


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Monday, May 30, 2011

Explore conservation areas on National Trails Day

Discover nature by exploring some of the 700-plus miles
of foot, bicycle and equestrian trails on conservation areas.
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – National Trails Day is Saturday, June 4, and Missouri conservation areas (CAs) have more than 700 miles of foot, bicycle and equestrian trails to celebrate and explore.
This is the American Hiking Association’s 19th annual National Trails Day. The program is a way to celebrate trails that allow people to discover the natural world through outdoor activities. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) provides trails at more than 136 CAs and 10 nature and education centers throughout the state. This includes 45 areas for horseback riding and 52 areas that allow cycling.
Bluffwoods CA in Buchanan County is one example of the hiking opportunities available at CAs. This area has five trails and one of northwest Missouri’s last remnants of oak-history forest. Trails include the disabled-accessible Forest Nature Trail and Lone Pine Trail, which offers a scenic overlook across the Missouri River.
Caney Mountain CA in Ozark County offers hikers a chance to roam through diverse land types that include savanna, glade and woodlands, along with a natural spring. The area even maintains a six-and-a-half-mile, multi-use trail for hiking, cycling and horseback riding.
Castor River CA in Bollinger County maintains six multi-use trails through woodlands, wetlands and streams. The area also is home to Blue Pond, Missouri’s deepest natural pond.
Brochures for self-guided interpretive hikes are available for some trails, and 28 CAs have disabled-accessible trails.
You can find a trail near you by contacting the nearest Conservation Department office or at http://1.usa.gov/kUlcW8. Check the “Designated Trails” box on this web page, and you can search for trails by region, county or type of trail and access area maps and regulations.
Hiking is permitted on all designated CA trails. Horseback riding and cycling are limited to trails specially designated for these activities. Many CA trails allow pets, but they must be leashed or confined at all times. Pets are not permitted at Nature Centers.
When hiking or riding a trail, follow these tips to help ensure a safe experience.
·        Get a map and familiarize yourself with the CA you want to visit.
·        Tell someone about your plans, including when you expect to return.
·        Check weather conditions and avoid inclement weather.
·        Dress appropriately.
·        Learn to recognize possible plant and animal hazards such as poison ivy and ticks.
Follow all area regulations.
·        Leave only footprints and take only photographs.
MDC Nature Shops also offer “Conservation Trails,” a comprehensive guide to MDC trails that includes maps and facility information, points of historical and geological interest, and plants and wildlife you may encounter along the way. It is available for purchase at www.mdcnatureshop.com or at conservation nature centers for $5 plus tax. Get a 15% discount with a Conservation Heritage Card.
-Rebecca Maples-

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Sunday, May 29, 2011

Judge imposes maximum fine in zebra mussel case

Sentence highlights personal responsibility for negligent introductions.
SMITHVILLE – An Independence man received the maximum fine for introducing zebra mussels into Smithville Lake last year.
David Wayne Frazier, 51, pleaded guilty in Clay County Circuit Court to a charge of transporting a prohibited species. Judge Janet Sutton imposed a fine of $1,000 and six months of probation.
The case is the first prosecuted under a provision in Missouri’s Wildlife Code designed to stop the spread of invasive species. It began on June 28, 2010, when fisheries workers with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) discovered adult zebra mussels on a private boatlift during a swimming inspection of the Camp Branch Marina. An investigation by Conservation Agent Scott Stephens revealed that in October 2009, Frazier moved the boatlift from Lake of the Ozarks, where zebra mussels already were established.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and MDC staff immediately removed and decontaminated the lift. MDC, in cooperation with the Corps, Clay County Parks and Recreation and the City of Smithville, used a copper-based algae killer to eradicate the zebra mussel infestation in August 2010.
The Corps continues to monitor the lake for residual zebra mussels. None have been detected so far.
“Transporting invasive species like zebra mussels, emerald ash borers or silver carp from place to place can damage Missouri’s recreation, tourism and agriculture industries,” said MDC Invasive Species Coordinator Tim Banek.
For information about how to identify invasive species and how to avoid spreading them, visit www.mdc.mo.gov/node/4086.
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Saturday, May 28, 2011

Public Invited to Share Ideas about Katy Trail State Park June 4


JEFFERSON CITY, MO, MAY 24, 2011 – The public is invited to bring their ideas to an informational meeting on Saturday, June 4 to discuss issues related to the section of Katy Trail State Park between Matson and Portland.  The open house will be held from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Katy Trail State Park's trailhead at Dutzow. 
Recent accomplishments and future plans will be highlighted during the open meeting, including drainage and trail surface repairs in the trail. Visitors are invited to share comments on the park’s services and operations.  Information about volunteer opportunities will be available.
This informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort to ensure citizens have input on facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.
            Katy Trail State Park’s Dutzow trailhead is located off of Highway 94 in Dutzow.   People requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling Graham Cave State Park at 573-564-3476 or the Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf). For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com.


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Friday, May 27, 2011

Wildflower hike planned June 4 at Morris State Park

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., MAY 24, 2011 – Discover the wildflowers of Morris State Park near Campbell on a hike June 4. The hike will be from 9 to 10:30 a.m. and is free and open to the public.
Morris State Park is located on top of Crowley's Ridge, which rises above the Mississippi River floodplain. It is home to many interesting plants not found in the Missouri Ozarks or swamps of the southeastern part of the state.  The morning will be spent searching out some of these plants and learning more about them. During the hike, you will see numerous birds, mushrooms and wildlife, and discuss the processes that created this interesting landform. The nature hike will begin at the parking lot and the hike will be a distance of about 1.5 miles.  Bring your binoculars, cameras and sense of adventure for this fun-filled morning on Crowley's Ridge.
            Morris State Park is located five miles north of Campbell on Route WW in Dunklin County. For more information, contact Hunter-Dawson State Historic Site at 573- 748-5340 or the Department of Natural Resources toll free at 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf). For information on state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com.
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Thursday, May 26, 2011

MDC Fishing Report 5/26/2011

In most streams south of the Missouri River, black bass season will open May 28, 2011, until that date all black bass in those streams must be returned to the water unharmed immediately after being caught.  For details see Chapter 6 of the Wildlife Code.

PLEASE CHECK REGULATIONS CAREFULLY: Special regulations may apply to designated portions of water bodies; some baits and lures may not be legal for all portions.



CENTRAL REGION (573) 882-8388

    LAKES

Binder: 68 degrees, normal, dingy; largemouth bass good on plastic worms and topwater lures; bluegill good on crickets and worms; channel catfish good on cicadas and nightcrawlers; all other species slow.




 (Report made on 5/24/2011)

Blind Pony Lake: 65 degrees, normal, dingy; largemouth bass good; sunfish fair on nightcrawlers; all other species slow; the lake is closed to private boats, and bait held or transported in containers with water is prohibited. (Report made on 5/24/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Bagnell Tailwater): 59 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass season opens May 28th, try worms, dark colored soft plastic worms; white bass fair on light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; crappie fair using crappie jigs and minnows; catfish good on cut shad, chicken livers and worms.


 (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Glaize): 64 degrees, muddy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastic worms, buzzbaits and crankbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; crappie good on crappie jigs and minnows; catfish good on worms and cut baits.
 (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Gravois): 64 degrees, muddy; crappie fair; black bass fair; white bass slow; catfish good.




 (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Niangua): 64 degrees, muddy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastic worms, buzzbaits and crankbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; crappie good on crappie jigs and minnows; catfish good on worms and cut baits.

 (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Lake of the Ozarks (Osage): 64 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastic worms, buzzbaits and crankbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; crappie good on crappie jigs and minnows; catfish good on worms and cut baits.


 (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Little Dixie: 60 degrees, high, muddy; crappie good on minnows and jigs; bluegill fair on worms and crickets; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers and stinkbaits; largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits; all other species slow.  Area closed to all activity between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

    RIVERS

Lamine: rising, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Missouri (Middle): rising, muddy; channel catfish, blue catfish and flathead catfish good on cut bait and live baits; all other species slow.
 (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Osage (lower, at Tuscumbia): 55 degrees, normal, dingy; black bass season opens May 28th, try worms, dark colored soft plastic worms; white bass fair on light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; crappie fair using crappie jigs and minnows; catfish good on cut shad, chicken livers and worms.
 (Report made on 5/25/2011)

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KANSAS CITY REGION (816) 655-6254

    LAKES

James A. Reed Area: 68 degrees, clear; full pool; bluegill, largemouth bass and redear sunfish good; channel catfish fair; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Montrose: 67 degrees, high, muddy; catfish fair; all other species slow; fishing pressure light. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Schell-Osage (Atkinson Lake): 70 degrees, high, dingy; catfish good, all other species fair. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Schell-Osage (Schell Lake): 71 degrees, high, muddy; catfish good; all other species fair. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Truman: 66 degrees, high, dingy; crappie good using jigs; black bass fair using spinnerbaits and jigs; catfish fair using cut bait or shad; white bass and hybrid bass fair using jigs. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Truman Tailwaters: 66 degrees, dingy; releasing 22,300 cfs; crappie good; white bass and catfish fair. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

    RIVERS

Missouri River: high, catfish fair using goldfish. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

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NORTHEAST REGION (660) 785-2420

    LAKES

Hunnewell: 75 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish good on Shad Raps and chicken liver; bluegill good on crickets; crappie good on Twister Tails; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Long Branch: 65 degrees, high, muddy; crappie fair on jigs and minnows; channel catfish and flathead catfish fair on live bait and liver; hybrid stripers fair on trotlines on artificial lures; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Mark Twain: 68 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie good on all types of jigs and minnows; channel catfish good on cut bait and nightcrawlers; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Sever: 71 degrees, normal, dingy; crappie fair on minnows; bluegill fair on crickets; channel catfish good on liver and stinkbaits; largemouth bass good on spinnerbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Thomas Hill: 70 degrees, high, dingy; flathead catfish fair on setlines; small channel catfish fair on live bait; crappie fair on jigs and minnows in the rocks; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

    RIVERS

Mississippi (above St. Louis): 61 degrees, high, muddy; river near flood stage; channel catfish fair on worms and live bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Salt (below Mark Twain): 72 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

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NORTHWEST REGION (816) 271-3100

    LAKES

Bilby Ranch Lake: 70 degrees, normal, dingy; channel catfish good on cut bait; largemouth bass fair on crankbaits and plastics; crappie, walleye and bluegill slow on live bait. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Mozingo: 68 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good in shallow water; crappie good on deep brush; bluegill fair in shallows with worms; channel catfish good on cut bait; walleye good on jigs or crankbaits. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Paho: 68 degrees, high, dingy; channel catfish good on nightcrawlers and crayfish at the road tubes on the north end of the lake and at the spillway located at the southwest corner of the dam. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Pony Express: 71 degrees, high, dingy; largemouth bass good on topwater baits; bluegill good on worms; crappie good on jigs; channel catfish good on Sonny's doughbait; all other species fair. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Smithville: 67 degrees, the lake is muddy in the arms with clearer water on the main lake; crappie fair, the spawn is mostly over, so fish are moving back into deeper water and cover, try minnows and/or jigs in deeper tree cover near bay entrances; black bass fair in shallow water on a wide variety of lures, try spinnerbaits, stickbaits and jigs; catfish fair on nightcrawlers, shad, and prepared baits; white bass fair in the creek arms on jigs and Road Runners; walleye fair on jigs, worms, and rattle baits on flat lake points. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

    RIVERS

Grand: 58 degrees, falling, dingy; channel catfish and blue catfish good; flathead catfish fair; all other species good. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Missouri (below Iowa line): 65 degrees, high, muddy; channel catfish and carp fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

----------------------
OZARK REGION (417) 255-9561

    LAKES

Bull Shoals (East): 68 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Norfork: 68 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

    RIVERS

Big Piney (lower, Pulaski Co.): 65 degrees, rising, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Big Piney (Upper): 64 degrees, rising, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Bryant Creek: 67 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Current: 64 degrees, rising, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Eleven Point: 60 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Gasconade (middle, Pulaski Co.): 65 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Gasconade (upper): 65 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Jacks Fork: 65 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

North Fork: 60 degrees, high, muddy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

----------------------
SOUTHEAST REGION (573) 290-5858

    LAKES

Clearwater Lake: 72 degrees, high, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Council Bluff: 67 degrees, high, clear; largemouth bass good on dark colored soft plastics; bluegill fair on worms and crickets; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Cypress Lake: 72 degrees, high, dingy; crappie fair in 2'-3' depths using minnows and jigs; bluegill fair in 1'-3' depths using crickets, small jigs, and worms; largemouth bass fair in 2'-3' depths on minnows and jigs, spinnerbaits and Rattle Traps; channel catfish fair in 2'-3' depths using crickets, worms, and stinkbait; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Duck Creek: 78 degrees, high, clear; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Lake Girardeau: 64 degrees, normal, clear; largemouth bass good on plastic worms; bluegill and redear sunfish fair on crickets and jigs; all other species fair. (Report made on 5/23/2011)

Perry County Lake: 77 degrees, normal, dingy; bluegill good on crickets and worms; channel catfish good on worms; largemouth bass fair on spinnerbaits; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Robert DeLaney Lake: high, dingy; crappie fair along the bank on jigs and minnows; bluegill fair on crickets, worms, and waxworms. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Wappapello: high, muddy; channel catfish fair on nightcrawlers; bluegill fair on crickets and worms; all other species slow. Wappapello Lake is still very high and most of the access points are still closed.  Highway T just below the emergency spillway was destroyed when the water topped the spillway.  Call the Wappapello Lake Recreation Hotline for updates at 573-222-8139. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

    RIVERS

Black River (near Annapolis): 68 degrees, normal, clear; smallmouth bass and goggle-eye good on minnows and artificial bait; all other species slow. Black bass season closed until May 28, 2011. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Castor River (above Zalma): normal, dingy; black bass and goggle-eye fair on minnows; all other species slow.  Black bass season opens May 28. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Lower Black River (Clearwater Dam): high, dingy; channel catfish fair on worms and live bait; crappie fair on minnows; black bass fair on minnows and jigs (prohibited from harvest until the fourth Saturday in May); all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Mississippi (below Charleston): falling, muddy; channel catfish fair in floodwaters on worms and cut bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Mississippi River (Cape Girardeau): 61 degrees, falling, muddy; channel catfish fair on worms; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

St. Francis (above Wappapello): high, dingy; all species slow. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

St. Francis (below Wappapello): high, dingy; water levels extremely high; fishing limited due to levees being closed; all accesses remain closed. (Report made on 5/23/2011)

----------------------
SOUTHWEST REGION (417) 895-6881

    LAKES

Bull Shoals (West): 65 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good on brown/watermelon colored jigs, brown Shakey Head worms and crayfish type soft plastics in 15'-20' of water; white bass good on white sliders and purple or white swimming minnows below Powersite Dam; walleye good on Rogues below Powersite Dam. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Lake Taneycomo: 50 degrees, high, clear; a flow advisory is in effect; trout good on white marabou jigs, Rooster Tails, and crankbaits. (Report made on 5/25/2011)

Pomme de Terre: 69 degrees, high, dingy; water level is 8.7' high; largemouth bass good on spinning baits and plastic baits in submerged vegetation and around points in 12' of water or less; crappie good on minnows or jigs in 3'-8' of water along outside edges of vegetation staged 2' below a bobber or in deeper water over established fish attractors; catfish good on limb lines using hotdogs, shad, liver, crayfish or worms; all other species fair. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Stockton: 65 degrees, high, clear; black bass good on crankbaits off banks in 12' of water and Texas rigged in 8' of water; catfish good on nightcrawlers and shrimp; crappie good with tube jigs near the bank in brush piles; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Table Rock (James River arm): 66 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good on white or white/chartreuse spinnerbaits, also try gray or white grubs on a 1/22 oz. jig; Carolina rigging plastic worms is also producing bites on plum, purple, motor oil or watermelon colored baits; catfish good on pole and line using Yellow Fins, creek chubs, nightcrawlers, stinkbaits and cut bait, trotlines also working well; smallmouth bass good on white or shad colored Super Flukes or Slug-Go; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Table Rock (main lake): 66 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good on white or white/chartreuse spinnerbaits, also try gray or white grubs on a 1/2 oz. jig; Carolina rigging plastic worms is also producing bites on plum, purple, motor oil or watermelon colored baits; catfish good on pole and line using Yellow Fins, creek chubs, nightcrawlers, stinkbaits and cut bait, trotlines also working well; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

    RIVERS

Big Niangua: 56 degrees, high, dingy; water levels still high; black bass slow, catch and release only until May 28, best on soft plastics; goggle-eye slow, best on soft plastics and jigs; trout slow, best on natural baits and Power Baits below Bennett Spring; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/24/2011)

James River (lower): 65 degrees, high, muddy; black bass and smallmouth bass (catch and release until May 28) good on nightcrawlers and plastic worms at morning and dusk; catfish good on cut bait and nightcrawlers; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

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ST. LOUIS REGION (636) 300-1953

    LAKES

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lake 33: 73 degrees, high, dingy; bluegill fair on worms; black bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; catfish fair on stinkbaits and chicken liver; limit 4; crappie good on tube & curly tail jigs and minnows; please remove litter. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Busch Memorial Conservation Area Lakes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 23: 73 degrees, high, muddy; channel catfish good on stinkbaits and chicken liver due to recent stocking; limit 4; bluegill fair on worms; black bass fair on spinnerbaits and crankbaits; limit 4; please remove litter.


 (Report made on 5/26/2011)

    RIVERS

Big River: 65 degrees, normal, clear; channel catfish fair on liver, cut bait and worms; catch and release only black bass (until May 28) slow on minnows; carp slow on dough balls; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Bourbeuse (middle, lower, Franklin Co.): 69 degrees, high, muddy; channel catfish fair on cut bait, worms and blood bait; all other species slow on worms.
 (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Meramec (above Sullivan, Crawford Co.): 64 degrees, rising, muddy; all species slow due to recent high water. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Meramec (below Eureka): 63 degrees, rising, muddy; all species slow due to heavy rains. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Missouri (below New Haven): 66 degrees, high, muddy;  channel catfish  fair on worms and prepared bait; all other species slow. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

----------------------
TROUT PARKS

Bennett Spring State Park: 54 degrees, the spring level is near normal and still clearing; Zone 1 and 2 best lures: John Deere colored mini jigs, ginger colored and brown colored bead head Cracklebacks, gingersnap with 8 oz. gold head colored, pink and white colored and black and yellow colored and yellow and chartreuse colored marabou jigs, black colored with a silver spinner and white colored with a silver spinner Rooster Tails, shrimp colored, chartreuse colored and easter egg colored glo balls; Zone 3 best lures: orange colored and orange with sparkles colored Power Baits, yellow corn and salmon eggs. Fishing hours for May are 6:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.  Fishing hours for June are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Maramec Spring Park: 55 degrees, fishing is good; the water is within the banks and dingy due to rains in the area but is slowly clearing up; dough and putty baits are producing good numbers; fish free floating or underneath a float; feather jigs in black/yellow, olive, white, and pink are producing good numbers of fish; fishing hours for the month of May are 6:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.  (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Montauk State Park: 56 degrees, due to recent rain the river level is higher than normal. The water is dingy. The river is fishable. Fishing is good on most baits and flies with bright colors and scented baits working the best.  The best fishing is during the morning and evening hours. May fishing hours are 6:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.


For up-to-date stream conditions check  http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440 (Report made on 5/26/2011)

Roaring River State Park: 57 degrees, the stream is off color and above normal; the river is dropping and should get to a good level by the weekend; plastic worms and power eggs are working very well; use scented baits in zones allowed; spinners are good; Rooster Tail-type spinners in black, brown, olive and bright orange have all been good.

 (Report made on 5/26/2011)
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Black bass season opens May 28 for Ozark Streams

Limits and other regulations vary by body of water.

JEFFERSON CITY MO – The fourth Saturday in May marks the opening of catch-and-keep black bass season in Missouri Ozark streams for largemouth, smallmouth and spotted bass. The Ozark-streams season runs from May 28 to Feb. 29, 2012.

Black bass fishing and possession is open year ‘round for impoundments, and areas of the state other than the Ozarks. These other areas are defined as: the Mississippi river, all waters north of the south bank of the Missouri River, the St. Francis River downstream from Wappapello Dam and on streams in that portion of southeast Missouri bounded by a line from Cape Girardeau following Missouri highways 74 and 25, U.S. highways 60, 67 and 160, and the west bank of the Little Black River to the Arkansas state line. 

While the daily limit on black bass in most of the state’s waters is six with a possession limit of 12, there are many lakes, rivers and streams with special daily limits, as well as different length limits.  It is important for anglers to know the specific black bass fishing regulations for the areas they will fish.

More information is available in the Missouri Department of Conservation’s2011 Summary of Missouri Fishing Regulations available from permit vendors, Department of Conservation offices and online atwww.MissouriConservation.org.

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