Thursday, October 31, 2013

Informational meeting for Big Oak Tree State Park and Towosahgy State Historic Site on Nov. 4

English: Boardwalk through Big Oak Tree State ...
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The public is invited to bring their ideas to an informational meeting on Big Oak Tree State Park and Towosahgy State Historic Site. The meeting will be held on Monday, Nov. 4, at the City Administration Building, 219 N. Washington in East Prairie. 
Recent accomplishments and future plans will be highlighted during the informational meeting. Topics will include future management plans, research projects and upcoming programming. Visitors are invited to share comments on services and operations at both sites. The informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort by Missouri State Parks to ensure the public has input on services provided in state parks and historic sites.
Individuals requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling Hunter-Dawson State Historic Site at 573-748-5340 or Big Oak Tree State Park at 573-649-3149. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.  

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

MDC needs hunter help with CWD sampling in north-central Missouri

English: White-tailed deer
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Effort is for deer harvested in Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph and Sullivan counties.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is again working with hunters from around the state, along with taxidermy shops and meat processors in north-central Missouri, to collect tissue samples from adult deer harvested during the fall archery and firearms deer seasons. The cooperative effort is part of MDC’s ongoing work to detect cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Missouri’s free-ranging deer.

The sample collection effort is limited to deer harvested in MDC’s CWD Containment Zone of Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph and Sullivan counties. MDC encourages hunters to take deer harvested in these counties to one of numerous cooperating locations in the region to have a tissue sample taken for testing. Sampling locations include area taxidermists and meat processors, and MDC offices in Columbia, Chillicothe and Kirksville during normal business hours.

Removing a tissue sample is free, takes only a few minutes and will not reduce the food or mount value of harvested deer. The sampling effort is taking place until Jan. 15. Test results typically take 3-4 weeks and are being posted for participating hunters on the MDC website at mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/applications/cwdSurveillance/cwdSurveillance.aspx.
More information on CWD and a list of sample-collection locations can be found in MDC’s “2013 Fall Deer & Turkey Hunting Regulations and Information” booklet available at MDC offices and nature centers, from permit vendors, and online at tinyurl.com/obxjp27.

The Department also encourages hunters throughout the state who encounter or harvest deer in poor condition with no obvious injuries to contact their local conservation agent or MDC office. Local MDC contacts can be found online atmdc.mo.gov.

CWD is always fatal to white-tailed deer and other members of the deer family, called cervids. There is no evidence that the disease can affect humans or domestic animals. CWD was first found Missouri in 2010 and remains confined to 21 confirmed cases in both captive and free-ranging deer in a small area that borders northeastern Linn and northwestern Macon counties. Cooperation from hunters during past sampling efforts helped detect cases found in free-ranging deer from the area.

“Infectious diseases such as CWD are a serious and growing threat to Missouri’s estimated 1.4 million free-ranging and 9,000 captive white-tailed deer, and the many Missourians, businesses, and communities that rely on a healthy and abundant deer population,” said MDC Deer Biologist Jason Sumners. “This includes nearly 520,000 deer hunters, nearly two million wildlife watchers, thousands of landowners, 12,000 Missouri jobs, and hundreds of businesses and communities around the state that depend on the $1 billion annual economic boost related to deer hunting and watching.”

MDC is also working with concerned citizens to identify actions to prevent new occurrences of CWD and to limit its spread in both captive and free-ranging deer. The Department encourages concerned citizens to share their comments online atmdc.mo.gov/deerhealth.

Monday, October 28, 2013

Informational meeting at Hawn State Park Nov. 2

English: Pickle Creek in Hawn State Park in Mi...
Pickle Creek in Hawn State Park in Missouri (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The public is invited to bring their ideas to an informational meeting on Saturday, Nov. 2 at Hawn State Park near Ste. Genevieve.   The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. at the park’s amphitheater.

Representatives from the facility will provide information on future plans for the park and answer questions. Visitors are invited to share comments and suggestions about the park. These informational meetings are part of an ongoing effort by the Missouri State Parks to ensure that the public has input on services and facilities offered in state parks and historic sites.

A visit to Hawn State Park is also a great opportunity to log miles as a part of the Governor’s 100 Missouri Miles Challenge. To celebrate Missouri’s distinction as the “Best Trails State” by American Trails and to encourage Missourians to enjoy the outdoors, Gov. Jay Nixon and First Lady Georganne Nixon are inviting Missourians to join them in completing 100 Missouri Miles of outdoor physical activity by the end of the year.

For more information and to take the Challenge, visit 100MissouriMiles.com. Participants can also share adventures, post photos and learn about upcoming events by connecting with 100 Missouri Miles on Facebook and Twitter.

Hawn State Park is located off Highway 144, 20 miles west of Ste. Genevieve in Ste. Genevieve County. The amphitheater is located in the campground. Individuals requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling the park directly at (573) 883-3603. For more information about Missouri state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Sunday, October 27, 2013

Open house, cabin reservation lottery set for Nov. 1 at Sam A. Baker State Park

English: The dining lodge at Sam A. Baker Stat...
The dining lodge at Sam A. Baker State Park was built by the CCC of native stone and wood. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The public is invited to bring their ideas to an open house at Sam A. Baker State Park on Friday, Nov. 1 between 9 a.m. and noon outside the park store.   The open house also marks the opening of the cabin reservation lottery for the 2014 recreational season. The lottery will determine the order of preference for cabin reservations at the park.

A Sam A. Baker State Park tradition, requests to be entered into the lottery reservation system may be made in person at the park beginning at 8:30 a.m. and the drawing will begin at 9 a.m. Sam Baker Concessions will be at the park to administer the lottery and assist individuals with their reservations. Cabin rental reservations can also be made over the phone by calling 573-856-4223 beginning at 9 a.m.

Cabin rental reservations are made through Sam Baker Concessions, while picnic shelter houses may be reserved directly through the park in person or by phone at 573-856-4411. Throughout the open house event park representatives will be available to answer questions provide information on future plans for the facility. Visitors are invited to share comments and suggestions about park services and operations. In the event of rain, the meeting will be moved to the park dining lodge. This open house is part of an ongoing effort by Missouri State Parks to ensure citizens have input regarding the facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.

A visit to Sam A. Baker State Park is also a great opportunity to log miles as a part of the Governor’s 100 Missouri Miles challenge. In addition to 25 miles of hiking and equestrian trails through wooded natural and wild areas, Sam A. Baker State Park also features a 1.5 mile accessible paved path suitable for walking, jogging and bicycles. To celebrate Missouri’s distinction as the “Best Trails State” by American Trails and to encourage Missourians to enjoy the outdoors, Gov. Jay Nixon and First Lady Georganne Nixon are inviting Missourians to join them in completing 100 Missouri Miles of outdoor physical activity by the end of the year.

For more information and to take the Challenge, visit 100MissouriMiles.com. Participants can also share adventures, post photos and learn about upcoming events by connecting with 100 Missouri Miles on Facebook and Twitter.

Sam A. Baker State Park is located on Hwy 143, approximately 4 miles north of Patterson, MO in Wayne County. Individuals requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling the facility directly at 573-856-4411. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Saturday, October 26, 2013

Help wanted containing chronic wasting disease

The Missouri Department of Conservation asks hunters to help protect the state’s deer herd.

JEFFERSON CITY–Hunters are important partners in the Missouri Department of Conservation’s effort to slow the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD), and agency officials urge hunters to take simple precautions when processing deer.
Although there is no evidence that CWD can affect humans or domestic animals, it is always fatal to members of the deer family. It is caused by abnormal proteins, called prions, which can remain infective for years after an infected deer dies.
Deer can become infected if they are exposed to soil containing CWD prions. Prions can get into soil when infected deer or deer parts decompose on the soil surface. Since many hunters process their own deer, they are key players in slowing the spread of CWD.
“One way that CWD can spread is by the transportation and improper disposal of carcass parts by hunters,” says Conservation Department Resource Scientist Jason Sumners. “CWD prions are concentrated in the spinal column, brain and other non-edible parts of deer that hunters normally discard. It’s important for hunters to know that moving deer carcasses from one part of the state to another runs the risk of spreading CWD.”
CWD has been found in captive and free-ranging deer in Macon County. The Conservation Department has established a CWD Containment Zone in Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph, and Sullivan counties and has taken measures to confine the disease to this area. Sumners says he is confident that hunters will do everything they can to avoid spreading CWD if they understand how important proper carcass disposal is.
“No one has more at stake in this effort than hunters do,” he says.
Sumners says hunters should avoid cutting through bones, the spine or brain when processing deer carcasses. If they hunt somewhere other than home, they need to bring knives and containers so they can remove meat from bones and leave behind potentially infectious material.
If hunters must transport whole carcasses, then they need to send non-edible carcass parts to state-approved landfills, where they will be properly buried. This can be accomplished by double bagging the carcass remains and sending them through municipal trash collection. If this is impractical, bury the carcass deep enough that scavengers can’t dig it up.
Preparing antlered deer for taxidermy requires different precautions. Taxidermists use artificial head forms to create mounts, so there is no reason to keep skulls, which can carry prions. When removing the cape from the carcass, also skin the head. Use a power saw to remove the antlers, along with a small portion of the skull that joins them. Clean the inside of the skull plate with chlorine bleach before leaving the area where the deer was killed.
Many hunters prefer to make their own “European” mounts, where antlers are left on deer skulls and mounted without hide. Cleaning intact skulls usually includes boiling. This is not hot enough to deactivate prions, so tissues to be discarded should be soaked for approximately one hour in a 50-percent bleach mixture to minimize any potential for those materials to be infectious.
Sumners also encourages hunters who harvest deer within the containment zone to donate tissue samples for the CWD monitoring program the Conservation Department started in 2002.
The Wildlife Code of Missouri requires hunters who harvest deer, elk, or moose out of state and bring the animal with the spinal column or head attached into Missouri to call toll free, 877-853-5665, and report the animal’s entry within 24 hours. They also must take the carcass to a licensed meat processor or taxidermist within 72 hours of entry. This is designed to prevent introducing CWD into new areas of Missouri from other states.
Hunters transporting deer through Missouri en route to other states do not need to call the number.
Details about these measures are listed in the 2013 Fall Deer & Turkey Hunting Regulations and Information booklet, which is available at MDC offices, where hunting permits are sold and online at mdc.mo.gov/node/3656.

Friday, October 25, 2013

Informational meeting at Route 66 State Park Oct. 26

English: This is a picture of the Meramec Rive...
 Meramec River as it flows past Route 66 State Park in St. Louis County, Missouri. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The public is invited to bring their ideas to an open house Saturday, Oct. 26 at Route 66 State Park near Eureka. The informational meeting will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. at the park’s visitor center and refreshments will be served.

Representatives from the park will be on hand to review recent activities and discuss future projects. Visitors will be invited to share comments regarding park operations and plans for development.  The informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort by Missouri State Parks to ensure the public has input on services provided in state parks and historic sites.

The informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort by Missouri State Parks to ensure the public has input on services provided in state parks and historic sites.

A visit to Route 66 State Park is also a great opportunity to log miles as a part of the Governor’s 100 Missouri Miles challenge. To celebrate Missouri’s distinction as the “Best Trails State” by American Trails and to encourage Missourians to enjoy the outdoors, Gov. Jay Nixon and First Lady Georganne Nixon are inviting Missourians to join them in completing 100 Missouri Miles of outdoor physical activity by the end of the year.

For more information and to take the Challenge, visit 100MissouriMiles.com. Participants can also share adventures, post photos and learn about upcoming events by connecting with 100 Missouri Miles on Facebook and Twitter.

Route 66 State Park is located two miles east of Eureka off Interstate 44 in St. Louis County. People requiring special services or accommodations to attend the open house can make arrangements by calling the park directly at 636-938-7198. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Informational meeting at Castlewood State Park Oct. 26

Castlewood State Park
Castlewood State Park (Photo credit: fotobydave)
The public is invited to bring their ideas to an open house on Saturday, Oct. 26 at Castlewood State Park near Ballwin. The informational meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the park office and refreshments will be provided.

Recent accomplishments and future plans at the park will be highlighted. Visitors are invited to share comments on Castlewood State Park’s services and operations. Park staff will discuss ongoing efforts to remove invasive plant species from the park, repair trails and restore a portion of riparian forest bordering Kiefer Creek.

The informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort by Missouri State Parks to ensure the public has an opportunity to provide input on services provided in state parks and historic sites.

A visit to Castlewood State Park is also a great opportunity to log miles as a part of the Governor’s 100 Missouri Miles challenge. To celebrate Missouri’s distinction as the “Best Trails State” by American Trails and to encourage Missourians to enjoy the outdoors, Gov. Jay Nixon and First Lady Georganne Nixon are inviting Missourians to join them in completing 100 Missouri Miles of outdoor physical activity by the end of the year.

Castlewood State Park is located off of Highway 141, then west on Big Bend Road to Ries Road, then turn left on Ries Road. The park entrance is at the intersection of Kiefer Creek and Ries Roads. People requiring special services or accommodations to attend the open house can make arrangements by calling the park directly at 636-227-4433. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Autumn is a great time for trout fishing

Missouri’s trout parks, streams, and lakes are more beautiful than ever right now.

SPRINGFIELD – Note to trout anglers: Just because leaves are changing colors and your friends are talking about hunting deer, ducks, or small game doesn’t mean you have to put your fishing gear away.
Courtesy MDC
Trout fishing is hardly a secret in Missouri, but for many people, it’s not in the spotlight in autumn like it was back on March 1 when thousands of anglers participated in the state’s annual trout park opener. At this time of year, many people are planning hunting trips or are trying to squeeze in a couple more trips to the lake before winter fishing patterns – and winter temperatures – set in. For many, this will involve outings where adults can pass on their knowledge and love of the outdoors to children and grandchildren. For others, it means finding solitude and getting away from computers, meetings, and other stressors of work.

All this leads back to trout. Even though (to paraphrase Robert Frost) trout fishing is the road not frequently taken in terms of outdoor choices at this time of year, a trout-fishing trip can provide outdoor entertainment and tasty table fare for nature-lovers of all ages.

“Fall is a good time to fish the trout streams in Missouri,” said Craig Fuller, Missouri Department of Conservation fisheries biologists who oversees trout-management areas at Bennett Spring State Park and on the Niangua River. “You have nice weather, a lack of recreational float traffic, beautiful fall colors, usually stable and clear stream flows, and trout are actively feeding as they get ready for winter.”

The same holds true for Missouri’s four trout parks.

“Typically, October has fewer anglers than the summer months of June, July, and August,” said Mike Mitchell, who manages the MDC hatchery at Bennett Spring State Park in Laclede and Dallas counties. “The lower angler turn-out can make for a peaceful fishing experience. Water clarity during October is very good, which allows anglers to see the fish better. Fall colors and cooler weather make for a beautiful backdrop.”

The summer fishing season at Missouri’s four trout parks – Bennett Spring State Park, Roaring River State Park, Montauk State Park, and Maramec Spring Park – runs through Oct. 31. Fishing hours at the parks are from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. daily. A daily trout tag is required to fish at the parks.
Don’t worry – those who fish the trout parks in October won’t have to settle for summer’s left-overs. The streams at all four parks are stocked daily (based on predicted anger attendance) through the end of the month. That means, in October, approximately 30,000 fish are stocked at Bennett Spring, Roaring River, and Montauk, and 10,000 are put into the water at Maramec Spring. The size of the fish trout-park anglers can catch range from 12-inch stockers to lunkers that weigh between three and eight pounds.

After the trout parks’ summer seasons end October 31, all four areas will re-open for the winter catch-and-release season, which runs from November 8 through February 10. As the season’s name states, it is for catch-and-release fishing only – no trout may be kept.

Not all the trout parks are open every day during this season. The three state parks (Bennett Spring, Roaring River, and Montauk) are open for fishing on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Maramec Spring Park is open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. During the winter season at the trout parks, you don’t need to buy a daily trout park tag when you fish. You will need a trout permit and, if you are age 16 through 64, a Missouri fishing permit.

Lake Taneycomo in Taney County is another well-known Missouri trout fishery that is a great place to fish in the fall. As is the case with trout parks, trout stocking continues at Taneycomo at this time of year. (The lake is stocked each month throughout the year.) In October, more than 60,000 trout are put into the lake. Anglers can also visit Shepherd of the Hills Hatchery at the west end of Taneycomo (just below Table Rock dam) to learn how trout are raised.

If none of this has caught your fishing fancy, don’t forget about Missouri’s trout streams. There are several Ozarks streams that, because of suitable habitat conditions, are capable of sustaining trout populations. Under the Conservation Department’s trout management plan, these trout streams are categorized as either white ribbon trout areas, red ribbon trout areas or blue ribbon trout areas. The differences between the classifications have to do with differences in regulations and management strategies. Like the trout parks and Taneycomo, some trout streams also receive fall stockings.
“Managed trout streams get stocked at different rates and some get stocked more frequently than others,” Fuller said. “But, yes, there are trout-managed streams that get stocked in the fall.” As an example, Fuller said the Niangua River White Ribbon Trout Area gets stocked every month of the year with rainbow trout, From October through February, its gets stocked twice a month. Anglers are reminded that they need to purchase a trout permit to possess trout on Missouri’s white, red or blue ribbon trout streams and to fish at Lake Taneycomo upstream from the U.S. Highway 65 Bridge.
More information about trout-fishing opportunities in Missouri can be found at your nearest Conservation Department office or at www.missouriconservation.org.

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Informational meeting scheduled at Cuivre River State Park Oct. 26

The public is invited to bring their ideas to an informational meeting on Saturday, Oct. 26, at Cuivre River State Park in Troy. The open house will be held at the Cuivre River Visitor’s Center at 6 p.m.

The meeting will include discussion of recent accomplishments at the park and projects completed by 2013 State Park Youth Corps workers. Park staff will discuss future plans and hold an informal question and answer session. Visitors are invited to share comments on the park and its facilities. This informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort by the Missouri State Parks to ensure that citizens have input on facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.
A visit to Cuivre River State Park is also a great opportunity to log miles as a part of the Governor’s 100 Missouri Miles Challenge. To celebrate Missouri’s distinction as the “Best Trails State” by American Trails and to encourage Missourians to enjoy the outdoors, Governor Jay Nixon and First Lady Georganne Nixon are inviting Missourians to join them in completing 100 Missouri Miles of outdoor physical activity by the end of the year.
For more information and to take the Challenge, visit 100MissouriMiles.com. Participants can also share adventures, post photos and learn about upcoming events by connecting with 100 Missouri Miles on Facebook and Twitter.
Cuivre River State Park is located 3 miles east of Troy on highway 47. Individuals requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling the Cuivre River State Park directly at 636-528-7247. For information about state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Friday, October 18, 2013

Informational meeting at Bennett Spring State Park Oct. 25

The public is invited to bring their ideas to an informational meeting on Friday, Oct. 25, at Bennett
Spring State Park near Lebanon. The informational meeting will begin at 6 p.m. in the Nature Center classroom.
Staff from the park will present information about operations, resource management and recreational developments at the park. The agenda will include a summary of activities that took place in 2013 and future plans for the park. Visitors are invited to share comments and suggestions about the facility. This informational meeting is part of an ongoing effort by Missouri State Parks to ensure citizens have input regarding the facilities and services offered in state parks and historic sites.
A visit to Bennett Spring State Park is also a great opportunity to log miles as a part of the Governor’s 100 Missouri Miles challenge. To celebrate Missouri’s distinction as the “Best Trails State” by American Trails and to encourage Missourians to enjoy the outdoors, Governor Jay Nixon and First Lady Georganne Nixon are inviting Missourians to join them in completing 100 Missouri Miles of outdoor physical activity by the end of the year.
For more information and to take the Challenge, visit 100MissouriMiles.com. Participants can also share adventures, post photos and learn about upcoming events by connecting with 100 Missouri Miles on Facebook and Twitter.
Bennett Spring State Park is located 12 miles west of Lebanon on Hwy 64. Persons requiring special services or accommodations to attend the meeting can make arrangements by calling the park at 417-532-4338. For more information on Missouri state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Hunters check 600 deer in urban hunt

Five portions of the firearms deer season remain.

JEFFERSON CITY–Hunters checked 600 deer during the Urban Portion of Missouri’s Firearms Deer Season.
County harvest totals during the urban portion were: Boone, 77; Cass, 39; Christian, 9; Clay, 30; Cole, 33; Franklin, 57; Greene, 104; Jackson, 33; Jefferson, 64; Platte, 9; St. Charles, 98; and St. Louis, 47.
Female deer made up 83 percent of this year’s urban portion harvest. Hunters are only allowed to shoot antlerless deer during the Urban Portion. This focus on harvesting female deer is designed to control deer numbers in urban and suburban areas, where hunting pressure is lighter and the potential for deer-vehicle accidents and property damage is greater.
This year’s harvest was below average for the urban portion, which became part of the firearms deer season in 2003. Over the urban hunt’s 11-year history, smaller harvests have been associated with warm weather. For instance, hunters shot fewer than 600 deer per year in 2007, 2010, and 2011, when high temperatures averaged 83.7 degrees during the urban hunt. In 2004, 2005, and 2009, when daytime highs averaged 61.9 degrees, the harvest averaged 1,719 deer. This year’s temperature averaged 72.2 degrees.
Missouri’s six portions of firearms deer season total 42 days. The remaining portions of Missouri’s firearms deer season are: Early Youth (Nov. 2-3), November (Nov. 16-26), Antlerless (Nov. 27-Dec. 8), Alternative Methods (Dec. 21-31), and Late Youth (Jan. 4-5).

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Quick Draw application period approaching

English: crop of File:Bgforhunting.jpg Taken b...

“Poor-line”waterfowl hunters get more spots this year.
JEFFERSON CITY – Missouri residents can apply for hunting spots at Grand Pass, Eagle Bluffs, and Otter Slough conservation areas (CAs) under the Quick Draw system starting a week before the season opener. The only change this year is an increase in the number of hunting spots set aside for hunters without reservations.
The Missouri Department of Conservation uses Quick Draw to make hunting at these three state-owned wetlands more convenient and accessible to more hunters. In the past, the system allocated one-fifth of all hunting spots to hunters who were unsuccessful in the twice-weekly drawing. This year, the system will reserve one-quarter of all hunting spots for hunters without reservations.
Hunters will be able to register for the first drawing at Grand Pass CA starting at 12:01 a.m. Oct. 18 and closing at 3 p.m. Oct. 21. The initial registration period for hunting at Eagle Bluffs and Otter Slough CAs opens at12:01 a.m. Oct. 25 and closes at 3 p.m. Oct. 28.
After the initial drawing in each zone, applications will be open from 12:01 a.m. Friday through 3 p.m. Monday for reservations on the following Friday through Monday. Applications will be open from 12:01 a.m. Tuesday through 3 p.m. Thursday for reservations the following Tuesday through Thursday.
All three areas under Quick Draw will use the system to assign ADA-accessible blinds. Drawings for the youth waterfowl season will be handled as in the past.
The Quick Draw registration form, drawing results, and detailed information about the system are available atmdc.mo.gov/node/10272. Successful applicants who provide email contact information can receive notification of Quick Draw results at 8 p.m. the day of the drawing. Results are available online at 12:01 a.m. the morning following the drawing.
Hunters without reservations compete for available hunting spots by taking part in drawings at the three Quick Draw areas each morning. Hunters who participate in this drawing, popularly known as the “poor line,” compete for the one-quarter of all hunting spots reserved for them, plus the spots of any successful Quick Draw applicants who do not show up. Over the past three years, when poor-line hunters were guaranteed 20 percent of hunting spots, they ended up getting 56.5 percent of hunting spots, due to reservation holder no-shows.
The traditional waterfowl hunting reservation system is in effect at the Conservation Department’s 12 other managed wetland areas. The application deadline for that system has passed. Results are available atmdc.mo.gov/node/9632.

Conservation Action October 2013

The Conservation Commission met Oct. 3 and 4 in Kirksville. Commissioners present were:

Don C. Bedell, Sikeston, Chair
James T. Blair, IV, St. Louis, Vice Chair/Secretary
Don R. Johnson, Festus, Member
Tim Dollar, Blue Springs, Member


ADMINISTRATION
The Commission:
  • Received presentations from:
Ø  Resource Scientist Jason Isabelle about research into wild-turkey harvest management
Ø  Permit Services Supervisor Greg Jones about permit sales trends
Ø  Private Land Services Northeast Regional Supervisor George Shurvington about small-game management
Ø  Fisheries Northeast Regional Supervisor Brian Todd about small-lake management in northeast Missouri
Ø  Eric Kurzieski, Columbia, regarding spring turkey hunting regulations
Ø  Colin Sorhus, Green Castle, about Union Ridge Conservation Area (CA)
  • Approved the purchase of 40 acres in Shannon County as an addition to Rocky Creek Conservation Area
  • Approved the purchase of 199 acres in Christian County as an addition to Busiek State Forest and Wildlife Area
  • Approved the purchase of 422 acres in Morgan and Benton counties as an addition to Big Buffalo Creek CA
  • Approved the sale of the 3-acre Washington Towersite in Washington County
  • Approved the sale of the 4.64-acre Sullivan office site in Franklin County
  • Approved the sale of the 3-acre Crusader’s Access in Grundy County
  • Approved the designations of a new natural area in Vernon County as Praiurie View Natural Area (NA) and an addition to Dark Hollow NA in Sullivan County.
  • Suspended hunting, fishing, and/or trapping privileges of 38 Missouri residents and two nonresidents for Wildlife Code violations. Those whose privileges were suspended are:
Dennis Baklashev, Lake Ozark, fishing, 5 years
Trevor Barnes, Braymer, hunting, 9 years
Clayton J. Beall, Clarence, hunting, until 7-12-2015
Michael L. Bennett, Bunker, hunting, 3 years
John Burlingame, Kahoka, hunting and fishing, until 7-25-15
Dorel Chobanu, Sedalia, hunting and fishing, 3 years
Constantin Ciobanu, Hughesville, fishing, 9 years
Fred Clark, Macon, hunting, until 9-10-15
Clint E. Clayton, Raytown, all sport privileges, 2 years
Jeffrey D. Copas, Sedalia, all sport privileges, 1 year
Seth Cunningham, Green City, hunting, 1 year
Darrell L. Eckhoff, Potosi, hunting, 3 years
Gary B. Garman, Monett, all sport privileges, 1 year
Justin G. Head, Chillicothe, hunting and trapping, 4 years
Michael E. Hefner, Springfield, all sport privileges, 1 year
Harland Igou, Independence, all sport privileges, 4 years
Ryan S. Jacobs, Brunswick, all sport privileges, 1 year
Jeremy D. Kendzora, St. Joseph, all sport privileges, 1 year
Jordan L. Kinder, West Plains, hunting and fishing, 1 year
Alexander Kozlov, Nixa, fishing, 6 years
Radu Kukosh, Sedalia, fishing, 3 years
Joshua Luechtefeld, Leslie, hunting, 1 year
Yuriy Matsyokha, Green Ridge, fishing, 17 years
Layton E. Metcalf, Cape Fair, hunting, 1 year
Kendall W. Monroe, Cherryville, hunting, 1 year
James R. Moore, Jr., Calhoun, hunting, 1 year
Tien D. Nguyen, Jefferson City, fishing, 1 year
Derek M. O’Brien, Hannibal, hunting, 1 year
Alexsandr Postevka, Springfield, hunting and fishing, 2 years
Corey J. Pudivitr, Doniphan, hunting, 3 years
Peter Rukosunev, Henderson, Colo., fishing, 1 year
Lindell W. Sanders, Winona, hunting, 3 years
Colby S. Shelkop, St. Joseph, hunting, 1 year
Michael J. Shepherd, Center, fishing, 1 year
Jere D. Smith, Warsaw, fishing, 1 year
Heath A. Swindle-Reich, Springfield, hunting, 3 year
Josh Teel, Bucklin, hunting, 4 years
Vasiliy Tsipan, Sedalia, fishing, 1 year
Troy W. Watkins, Troy, all sport privileges, 1 year
Vitaliy Zubkov, Woodborn, Ore., fishing, 3 years
  • Approved the suspension or revocation of all hunting and fishing privileges of 270 people who are not in compliance with applicable child-support laws. Privileges suspended for noncompliance are reinstated once the Division of Child Support Enforcement notifies MDC that suspendees have come into compliance with the required laws.
  • Suspended privileges of 165 people under the provisions of the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact.
·        Imposed a hunting privilege suspension of three years for one Missouri resident who injured another person in a hunting incident. The hunters must complete a hunter-education training course before restoration of privileges.
·        Reinstated the hunting privileges of Scott W. Sales, Trimble.
·        Set its next regular meeting for Dec. 12 and 13 in St. Louis.

This document is provided for public information only and is not an official record of the Missouri Department of Conservation or Missouri Conservation Commission.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Family Fall Festival planned at Weston Bend State Park Oct. 19

The public is invited to enjoy the Family Fall Festival at Weston Bend State Park onSaturday, Oct. 19.
Sponsored by Missouri State Parks, the event will take place on the park grounds near the open shelter house from 1 to 4 p.m.
Visitors can enjoy apple cider pressing, Dutch oven cooking and blacksmithing demonstrations. There will also be live music, pumpkin decorating and nature-themed crafts and activities.  Admission to the event is free.
The Family Fall Festival at Weston Bend State Park is also a great opportunity to log miles as a part of the Governor’s 100 Missouri Miles challenge. To celebrate Missouri’s distinction as the “Best Trails State” by American Trails and to encourage Missourians to enjoy the outdoors, Gov. Jay Nixon and First Lady Georganne Nixon are inviting Missourians to join them in completing 100 Missouri Miles of outdoor physical activity by the end of the year.
For more information and to take the Challenge, visit 100MissouriMiles.com. Participants can also share adventures, post photos and learn about upcoming events by connecting with 100 Missouri Miles on Facebook and Twitter.
Weston Bend State Park is located off of Highway 45 near Weston. For more information on the event, call the park at 816-640-5443. For more information on Missouri state parks and historic sites, visit mostateparks.com. Missouri State Parks is a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.